Scott Cousins feels bad about Buster Posey’s injury

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Scott Cousins — the man who flattened Buster — spoke to the San Francisco Chronicle earlier today. The upshot: he does not regret the play, which he thought was a clean, albeit hard-nosed play.  He does, however, regret that Posey was hurt and, of course, never intended to hurt him:

I committed to it. I went in there hard. My instinct was just to check and make sure everyone was OK. I wanted to be a good sportsman about it. It is part of the game, but it’s a hard-nosed part of the game. You can’t change it, but you certainly don’t want anyone to get hurt. I wanted to knock the ball clean out of his glove, but I certainly didn’t want him to get hurt.”

This of course has led to a lot of “sure, you feel bad, but not as bad as Posey does” talk from both Giants fans and even from Bruce Bochy in an article I saw earlier this afternoon.  Which I suppose is understandable. As the comments in the earlier Posey posts at HBT illustrate, there is a lot of varying sentiment about it. As far as I can tell the consensus is yeah, it was a legal play, and one we see a lot of in baseball, but Cousins attack vector may not have been advisable or necessary.

I still can’t shake one notion, however. The notion that if Cousins had held up short or taken a less-than-aggressive path to the plate and been called out, that a lot of people would be on him today for not going hard and giving that proverbial 110%.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.