File photo of David Einhorn speaking at 6th Annual New York Value Investing Congress in New York City

Report: The Mets finally have a minority owner. And Fred Wilpon’s days could be numbered

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Multiple outlets are reporting this morning that the Mets have an agreement to sell 49% of the team to one David Einhorn of the hedge fund Greenlight Capital, Inc. for $200 million. The sale would not include a stake in SNY, it’s being reported. No word on what kind of managerial control, if any, Einhorn would have.

For those who care about such things, Einhorn is really young — he turns 43 this year — and is a serious poker player too. Colorful guy.

It’s also probably worth noting that Einhorn is in the news this week for much more significant business reasons:  he, as one of the bigger shareholders in Microsoft, is calling for the company to fire its CEO Steve Ballmer.  He’s also famous for being the guy who called B.S. on Lehman Brothers’ valuation and business practices well before anyone else did, and has made oodles shorting the stock of companies he feels are mismanaged. And he’s been pretty much vindicated in all of these assessments.

So: Einhorn is a guy who is not afraid to call for the head of management and he’s a guy who knows how to make a killing on a distressed asset.  Yeah, I can totally see Einhorn agreeing to a deal in which he’s willing to sit back and let Fred Wilpon do everything he wants to do without any power to question, control or take over the course of the New York Mets. No question about it. It’s like, totally his M.O.

It may not be today and it may not be tomorrow, but I have this feeling that Fred Wilpon’s days as majority owner of the Mets are numbered.

Video: Undercover David Ortiz drives a Lyft in Boston

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David Ortiz did one of those “Undercover Lyft” spots for, well, Lyft, in which famous people disguise themselves while driving passengers around. Yes, they’re ads, but they’re still pretty funny. At least this one was.

Best parts: (1) the woman who says she has two David Ortiz shirts to which Undercover Ortiz responds, “actually, all my shirts are his shirts”; and (2) when Ortiz agrees with someone that baseball games are “so loooong.” Oh, and at one point he tells a woman who said she was going to the Red Sox game that night that he was too. After he unmasked himself, she explains his own joke to him. Which, ooohhkay.

In other news, people who take Lyfts in Boston either don’t watch much baseball, because Ortiz’s costume is NOT very concealing, or else they simply don’t look at their Lyft driver while in the car, at all.

Scouting in Venezuela: “Someone is going to get killed. It’s just a matter of time”

MIAMI - MARCH 14:  Venezuela fans cheer with a country flag while taking on the Netherlands during round 2 of the World Baseball Classic at Dolphin Stadium on March 14, 2009 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images)
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Ben Badler of Baseball America has a story about how major league scouts who cover Venezuela are unhappy with the rules imposed upon them by the league. Rules, they say, which unreasonably prohibit them from scouting Venezuelan players in centralized, team-controlled locations or, alternatively, flying them to team facilities in the Dominican Republic or elsewhere.

The result: international scouts are forced to travel all over Venezuela to evaluate prospect. And, given how destabilized and dangerous Venezuela has become, they believe their safety is at risk:

“MLB’s rules that limit our ability to travel a Venezuelan guy to the Dominican Republic, that limit our ability to get them in a complex at different ages, all these rules are solely contributing to the risks that all of us are taking traveling from complex to complex, facility to facility in the streets,” said one international director. “Someone is going to get killed. It’s just a matter of time, and it’s on MLB when it happens, because they’re the ones who created these rules.”

As Badler notes, Major League Baseball itself has moved its annual national showcase out of the country due to safety concerns. It will not, however, relax scouting rules — which seem arbitrary on their surface in the first place — in order to make the job of international scouts safer.

It seems that Rob Manfred and the league owe their employees better than this. Or at the very least owe them an explanation why they don’t think they do.