Mets’ new owner David Einhorn won $660,000 in World Series of Poker and donated it to charity

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Most people probably responded to this morning’s news of the Mets adding a minority owner by thinking of, say, the financial ramifications and impact on the team, but my first thoughts were “the name David Einhorn sounds familiar” and then “I think I’ve seen this guy on television playing poker.”

Sure enough, before investing $200 million in the Mets he was featured during ESPN’s coverage of the World Series of Poker main event back in 2006, finishing 18th–in between well-known pros Jeff Lisandro and Prahlad Friedman–for a prize of $659,730.

And the reason he was a prominent storyline during ESPN’s coverage is that Einhorn pledged ahead of time to give all his winnings to charity, donating the money–which could have been as much as $12 million–to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

He was knocked out of the tournament–which was the biggest in poker history with 8,773 players ponying up $10,000 apiece–by eventual champion and card-catching king of the world, Jamie Gold.

Donating that kind of score is a good indication that Einhorn has pockets deep enough to help the Mets and an even better indication that he’s a pretty good guy. And a pretty good poker player too.

Miguel Sano gained weight this offseason

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Not all players coming in to spring training are in The Best Shapes of Their Lives. Some have put on a few pounds, such as Miguel Sano, notes Twins GM Thad Levine:

Sano has been given medical clearance to engage in all baseball workouts with his teammates, his surgically reinforced left shin now completely healed, though the Twins intend to lighten his schedule to prevent any new injuries.

They’d like to lighten something else, too: His “generous carriage,” as General Manager Thad Levine delicately put it last week. Sano’s conditioning understandably lags, after a winter largely spent incapacitated by the surgery.

Sano’s conditioning has often been a topic of conversation among the members of the Minnesota press corps, though not always in good faith. For example, last year when Sano injured his shin by fouling a ball off of it, one member of the The Fourth Estate found a way to make a column out of blaming the freak injury on Sano’s conditioning. At least in this instance his colleague is correctly noting that the poor conditioning is a result of the injury and not the cause.

Still, it’s just another issue facing Sano this spring. He’s out of shape, coming off of an injury, and — not that he’s due any sympathy for it — he’s facing a likely suspension arising out of the allegations of sexual assault leveled against him late last year.

So this spring we’ll be seeing more of Sano, it seems. At least until that time we’ll be seeing less of him.