We know McCourt and Wilpon are awful, but where does your team’s owner rank?

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Over at ESPN.com, Jim Caple decided to rank Major League Baseball’s owners from 1-30 with a little explanatory blurb.  You won’t be shocked to find Frank McCourt at the bottom and Fred Wilpon in the 29th position.

But what about the others? And for that matter, what makes an owner good anyway?  Is it just winning? If so, why are the Steinbrenners fourth?  Is it about making commitments to star players and exciting the fan base? If so, why are the Rockies’ owners so far down the list?

Personally I think Caple reveals a fairly coherent and at least defensible system by the time he’s all said and done, but there is clearly a lot of subjectivity to it all, as any list ranking this kind of thing must have.

And of course there is nothing more subjective than a fan’s feeling about his or her own team’s owners.  For instance, here’s Caple’s blub on the Braves:

13. Liberty Media, Atlanta: CEO Terry McGuirk isn’t exactly Ted Turner. Not that there is anything wrong with that at all.

Says you, Jim.  Ted may be unhinged, but dad gummit, the Braves won a World Series when he was in the owner’s box. And broadcast their games all over the damn country, growing the fan base.  Even when they lost, the product was a lot of fun, both for intentional and unintentional reasons.  I’m assuming that, these days, Turner is walking around the half of Montana that he owns, thinking up crazy schemes that will never see the light of day, but I’d give my right arm for him to be running the Bravos at the moment.

See how that works?

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.