There are a lot of legacies in this year’s draft

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I’m not really a draftnik. Amateur baseball players are a far flung lot and it’s not easy to keep track of them unless you’re Keith Law or someone and it’s your job to keep track of them.  With the exception of the Bryce Harpers and Stephen Strasburgs of the world, I usually begin to get to know prospects after they’re drafted, not before.

But I do always have fun hearing those familiar names:

Bloodlines run strong in the Grand Old Game, and this year’s Draft has an intriguing group of young thoroughbreds champing at the bit to hear their names called in the big leagues’ favorite June post parade, which will be held from June 6-8.

The names jump out at any baseball fan who’s been paying attention over the past decades. From Bichette to Bonilla, from Boras to Bream, from Dunston to Garvey to Guillen to Pudge (well, Rodriguez), you’re going to see serious big league progeny over the rounds of this year’s draft.

Dwight Smith, Jr., the son of former Cub Dwight Smith, may be the headlining legacy case.  Lateral moves are present as well, with the son of Wayne Gretzky also in the pool this year. Steve Garvey’s son Ryan is another notable, but save your jokes: Ryan is the son of Steve and his wife Candace Garvey and was born after all of that ugly business that popped up in the wake of his first wife’s autobiography. A shame, really.

I think the most fun, though, is Shane Boras, son of Scott.  I don’t know how much of a prospect he is, but it would awesome if he were a stud, got drafted high and then held out until the 11th hour for a big bonus, represented by his dad, who kept dropping sound bytes about how awesome he was.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.