Jury: airplane manufacturer not responsible in Cory Lidle’s death

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It was just less than a month ago that the Cory Lidle wrongful death trial began. The claim, brought by Lidle’s family: that the manufacturer of the airplane Lidle was flying malfunctioned and was responsible for his death.  Today the jury came back with a verdict. They did not agree.  The FAA’s determination of the matter — pilot error — remains the only explanation adopted by anyone who has dispassionately considered the matter.

HBT Commenter Emeritus Old Gator is a licensed pilot with thousands of hours under his belt and has experience with the sort of plane Lidle was flying that fateful day in October 2006.  His assessment, in comments last month, was as follows:

The scenario of an aircraft as relatively simple as a Cirrus going out of control due to a berserk Hall-9000 control system strikes me as too preposterous to take very seriously. This one has all the classic hallmarks of overreaching student pilot stupidity and an instructor who was asleep at the switch … I can tell you that any pilot who was trying to perform a 180-degree turn inside the Hudson corridor, below the level of the surrounding buildings, was doing something very foolish unless there was some kind of genuine emergency at hand – like, collision avoidance – and any instructor who would permit him to do so should have had his license yanked.

Cory Lidle’s death was a sad thing. But it would seem that his death was also the doing of his own errors and/or those of the flight instructor who died with him.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.