The Braves sign Julio Lugo for some reason

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It’s a pretty bad day when both your team and its division rival both sign guys to minor league deals, the rival’s signing is Scott Podsednik, and they’re move is far, far better than your team’s. But alas it was, as the Braves signed Julio Lugo for some reason.

Lugo tore up baseball to the tune of .249/.298/.282 last year and so impressed everyone with his winning attitude these past few years that no one gave him a shot this spring. So yeah, that’s a guy you gotta sign.

The worst part of it is that the Braves are in far greater need of outfield depth than infield help — if, indeed, you can call what Lugo provides “help” — due to the Jason Heyward’s and Nate McLouth’s injuries. So I’m actually sitting here wishing that the Braves would have signed Podsednik instead, and that’s about as pathetic a wish as there is. In case you haven’t noticed, the last few Braves games have made me profoundly bitter and pessimistic.

Oh wait, as I was writing this, Twitter follower @FuquaManuel notifies me that the Braves may have had a reason to get Lugo: he as a career 1.280 OPS in over 100 plate appearances against the Phillies.

But on second thought, that doesn’t make me feel better. The Braves have shown in the past couple of weeks that beating the Phillies head-to-head is no big deal.  It’s the rest of baseball that gives them trouble.  Sigh.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.