Were ballplayers of the 1950s … sissies?

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While doing what I do quite often — killing time over at Baseball Think Factory — I came across this Sports Illustrated article from 1954.  The headline: “Are Today’s Baseball Players Sissies Compared To The Old-timers?” Seriously!

Predictably, there was the usual assortment of “baseball is going to Hell” voices, two of which actually name-checked Old Hoss Radbourn:  Lefty Grove, Rogers Hornsby, Cy Young, Fred Clarke, Jimmy Foxx and Ed Walsh all thought that the young punks of the 50s were soft and spoiled.  Cy Young’s response was pretty par for the course:

“Yes. They can’t take it. I’ve seen some of them threaten the pitcher when a ball brushed them back. Most rugged old-timers took this as a part of the game. It’s the rule today to use several pitchers in one game. Iron Man McGinnity pitched 55 games for the Giants in 1903. He won three double-headers in one month.”

You can’t see me, but I assure you, I am rolling my eyes.  Still, you’ll be happy to know that not every former great who was asked pulled the “back in my day …” act.

Paul Waner, Al Simmons and Pie Traynor all agreed with the esteemed Herman Jacobs, more or less that the modern player was every bit as tough if not more so than the old timers.  Carl Hubbell and Frankie Frisch were a bit less committal, noting that there were a lot of differences between the modern game of the 1950s and the game back in their day (bonus: both claimed that a “rabbit ball” was in use in th 50s, proving that people have been complaining about jacked baseballs for decades), but at least they seemed to think about the matter rather than just react.

Anyway, I presume that, if I live long enough, I’ll see Jason Heyward and Justin Upton complaining about the players of the 50s one day too. The 2050s.

Sean Manaea pitches first no-hitter of 2018

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea delivered his first career no-hitter against the Red Sox in a decisive 3-0 victory on Saturday night. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea was nearly flawless, holding the Sox to four total baserunners and striking out 10 of 30 batters faced — a career record.

Manaea was gifted a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth inning. While the Red Sox managed to draw two walks off of Manaea, they didn’t come anywhere close to plating a run. Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning with an infield hit down the first base line, but strayed out of bounds and later saw his hit reversed on a call of batter interference.

Entering the ninth inning, the 26-year-old lefty was sitting at just 95 pitches through eight frames of no-hit ball. He quickly deposed Blake Swihart and Mookie Betts with a groundout and fly out, then walked Benintendi on seven pitches. Any threat the Red Sox might have posed was soon eliminated, however, as Hanley Ramirez ground into a force out to complete the no-hitter.

Manaea is the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter was also against an AL West rival, when the Mariners’ Chris Bosio clinched a 2-0 no-no on April 22, 1993. Manaea’s feat is even more outstanding given how dominant the Red Sox have looked this season: prior to Saturday’s defeat, they boasted a 17-2 record and had yet to be shut out during the regular season.