Shelby Miller

Minor league K leaders: Edwar Cabrera, Shelby Miller at the top

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Here’s a quick look at the minor league leaderboard for strikeouts.

1. Edwar Cabrera (23 – Rockies) – 68 K – 4.14 ERA in 50 IP for low-A Asheville
2. Shelby Miller (20 – Cardinals) – 59 K – 3.15 ERA in 40 IP for high-A Palm Beach
2. Tyler Skaggs (19 – D-backs) – 59 K – 3.20 ERA in 45 IP for high-A Visalia
4. Matt Moore (22 – Rays) – 56 K – 3.54 ERA in 40.2 IP for AA Montgomery
4. Brad Peacock (23 – Nationals) – 56 K – 2.13 ERA in 42.1 for AA Harrisburg
4. Eric Surkamp (23 – Giants) – 56 K – 1.88 ERA in 38.1 IP for AA Richmond
7. Jake Odorizzi (21 – Royals) – 55 K – 2.45 ERA in 36/2 IP for high-A Wilmington
8. Josh Smith (23 – Reds) – 54 K – 1.91 ERA in 42.1 IP for low-A Dayton
8. Allen Webster (21 – Dodgers) – 54 K – 2.47 ERA in 47.1 IP for high-A Rancho Cucamonga
10. Chad Bettis (22 – Rockies) – 51 K – 3.26 ERA in 47 IP for high-A Modesto
10. Jose Cisnero (22 – Astros) – 51 K – 5.94 ERA in 33.1 IP for high-A Lancaster
10. Brad Meyers (25 – Nationals) – 51 K – 2.61 ERA in 48.1 IP between AA/AAA
10. Juan Nicasio (24 – Rockies) – 51 K – 1.90 ERA in 42.2 IP for AA Tulsa
10. Joseph Wieland (21 – Rangers) – 51 K – 1.62 ERA in 44.1 IP for high-A Myrtle Beach

– Cabrera’s name certainly isn’t very well known, and as a 23-year-old in low-A ball, he’s not nearly the same kind of prospect as the next few guys on this list. His fastball is a bit below average, so he’s not going to be taken very seriously unless he can do it at higher levels.

– After Cabrera come the big names.  Of guys yet to make their major league debuts (basically, a qualification that allows me to rule out Julio Teheran), Miller may well be the top pitching prospect in the game.  Skaggs is showing incredible potential as well, though his walk rate is a bit high.  Of course, he’s the youngest pitcher on the list.

– Moore isn’t quite dominating the Southern League the way I thought he would, mostly because he’s given up six homers.  He has an outstanding 1.03 WHIP, and he’s striking out five batters for every one he walks.

– Peacock and Surkamp could be factors this year.   Peacock, blossoming in his fourth year in the Nationals system, has picked up velocity and now occasionally hits the mid-90s with his fastball.  A debut in the second half is a possibility, and he could be part of a very exciting rotation with Stephen Strasburg and Jordan Zimmermann next year.  Surkamp, another young lefty for the Giants, doesn’t have the fastball of either Jonathan Sanchez or Madison Bumgarner, but with two excellent offspeed pitches, he projects a mid-rotation guy.

– A few other names worth mentioning: Detroit’s Charlie Furbush is the strikeout leader for pitchers who have spent all season in Triple-A.  He’s fanned 47 while amassing a 2.90 ERA in 40.1 IP.  2010 first-rounder Drew Pomeranz would have made the list if the Indians weren’t being so careful with him; he has 48 strikeouts in just 32.2 IP.  And the top reliever on the board is Boston’s Juan Rodriguez.  He has 43 strikeouts in 24.1 IP for low-A Greenville.

Multiple Miami Marlins passed on joining Jose Fernandez on that boat

JUPITER, FL - FEBRUARY 24: Pitcher Jose Fernandez of the Miami Marlins poses for photos on media day at Roger Dean Stadium on February 24, 2016 in Jupiter, Florida. (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)
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A brutal couple of updates on the night of Jose Fernandez’s death from Jeff Passan of Yahoo and from Andre Fernandez of the Miami Herald.

Passan reports on the leadup to the fateful boat trip. About how a friend of one of the other men killed on the boat had pleaded with him not to go out in the dark. Then there’s this:

After Saturday’s game, Fernandez had asked a number of teammates to join him on the boat. One by one, they declined.

Marcell Ozuna was one of them. Andre Fernandez of the Miami Herald reports:

Following Monday’s game, Ozuna said he turned down an invitation from Fernandez after Saturday night’s game to go out with him and join him for a spin on his boat . . . “That night I told him, ‘Don’t go out,’” Ozuna said. “Everybody knew he was crazy about that boat and loved being out on the water. I told him I couldn’t go out that night because I had the kids and my wife waiting for me.

Losing a friend and teammate under such circumstances is brutal enough. Adding on survivor’s guilt would be close to impossible to bear.

David Ortiz: “I was born to play against the Yankees”

BOSTON, MA - APRIL 29:  David Ortiz  #34 of the Boston Red Sox celebrates after hitting a two-run home run in the eighth inning during the game against the New York Yankees at Fenway Park on April 29, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)
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David Ortiz has used Derek Jeter’s Player’s Tribune as his personal podium all year as he says goodbye to the Major Leagues. He continues that today, on the eve of his final series against the Yankees.

In it Ortiz talks about what playing the Yankees meant to him over the course of his career. About how the fan hate was real but something he embraced. About how the series back in the days of Jeter and Pettitte and Mariano and Mussina were “wars.” He also talks about how the Yankees were basically everything when he was growing up in the Dominican Republic. The only caps and shirts you saw were Yankees shirts and how they were about the only team you could see on TV there. As such, coming to Boston and then playing against the Yankees was a big, big deal.

Ortiz says “[s]ome players are born to be Yankees, you know what I’m saying? I was born to play against the Yankees.”

And he’ll get to do it only three more times.