Bernie Williams was once demoted to ninth in the order. How did he handle it?


I gotta admit: the Jorge Posada stuff has been a hoot for me. Helps that I’m not a Yankees fan, of course, but I’m not gonna lie: great fun in the way that all off-field drama is great fun for someone tasked with blogging about baseball for living.

Which makes me a bit sad that, with their sixth straight loss last night, the focus seems to be shifting this morning from the PosadaDrama to the Yankees poor performance on the field.  We can’t have that. Not yet anyway. We have all season to talk about teams performing well or performing poorly.  We have to savor the little firestorms as long as possible.

So let us link to The Morning Delivery, which takes us back to April 13, 2005, when a struggling Bernie Williams was put ninth in the order by Joe Torre, the first time he had been there in a decade.  You go read the post, but suffice it to say that he reacted somewhat better to it all than Posada did.

Not that I’m changing my stance on Posada. I still think this is fits the “everyone has a bad day” description and, while not Posada’s finest hour, is not something that should be held against him forever.  But I do feel obligated to compare him somewhat unfavorably to Williams who, in my view, has been totally boned by not being included in that whole “Core Four” nonsense.  He was more important in the more impressive part of the Yankees’ dynasty than Posada ever was and unlike Pettitte he never went anyplace.

Dude is owed a few more props than he gets.

Jeff Samardzija to undergo MRI on right shoulder

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Update (12:58 AM ET): Per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle, Samardzija has been diagnosed with a strained pectoral muscle. He’ll be shut down for a week. That’s good news for the Giants, considering the alternatives.


Giants starter Jeff Samardzija will undergo an MRI on his ailing right shoulder, according to NBC Sports Bay Area. The right-hander struggled in a minor league game on Wednesday, surrendering a pair of home runs and hitting a batter. Overall this spring, Samardzija has given up 15 runs (13 earned) on 17 hits (six homers) and seven walks with seven strikeouts in 11 innings.

This may mean Samardzija won’t be ready for the start of the regular season. Derek Holland would likely replace Samardzija in the rotation. Holland had been competing for the No. 5 spot in the Giants’ rotation.

Samardzija led the National League in losses last season with 15, also posting a 4.42 ERA with a 205/32 K/BB ratio in a league-high 207 2/3 innings. Since becoming a starter, Samardzija has been able to avoid injury, making 32 or 33 starts in each of the last five seasons.