Lorenzo Cain launches grand slam, hits for cycle at AAA

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Michael Aubrey wasn’t the only minor leaguer putting on an offensive show Saturday.

According to Robert Emrich of Milb.com, Royals farmhand Lorenzo Cain hit for the cycle and tallied a career-high seven RBI to lead the Triple-A Omaha Chasers over the Colorado Springs Sky Sox (an affiliate of the Rockies), 16-11.

Cain was a minor piece in this past winter’s Zack Greinke trade. He launched a first-inning grand slam, then doubled in the third and singled in the fourth. In the sixth, he hit a two-run triple.

“I can’t really point one thing out,” Cain said after the game. “I feel like we had a long day traveling today. I just tried to put together consistent at-bats and I was able to put a good swing on the ball today. I’m very pumped about it. I’ve always wanted to hit a grand slam and hit for the cycle, and it came in the same game. It’s a very special moment for me, so I’m very excited to get that done tonight. I had a few text messages from my mom and my girlfriend, and they were definitely excited for me.”

Cain improved his batting average 25 points with the one-day performance and is now hitting .308/.385/.500 with two homers, 14 RBI and five steals in five chances. He turned 25 years old in mid-April.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.