Harmon Killebrew through a 32-year-old’s eyes

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Unfortunately, none of us 20- and 30-something bloggers at HardballTalk ever got to see Harmon Killebrew play.  I just remember his all-time name near the top of the all-time home run leaderboard.  Killebrew.

As an avid collector as a youngster in the late-80s, I recall being excited to get his 1975 Topps card.  That colorful set was my favorite of the old-time cards, and while I was in no position to buy the 50s and 60s cards of Hall of Famers, those 70s cards were usually within reason.   

I didn’t realize it at the time, but that was Killebrew’s last baseball card.  Although he played for the Royals in 1975 — the only one of his 22 seasons not spent with the Senators/Twins — Topps didn’t include him in the 1976 set.  I’m guessing he wouldn’t have looked right in the Kansas City uniform anyway.

I’d always imagined Killebrew as the original Mark McGwire: a right-handed-hitting first baseman with huge power and modest averages.  Killebrew led the AL in homers six times and in RBI three times.  He won the MVP award in 1969 for hitting .276 with 49 homers and 140 RBI.

Of course, their builds weren’t at all similar.  But Killebrew also shared another trait in common with McGwire: he walked a ton.  He led the AL four times and he was seventh on the all-time list with 1,559 walks when he retired.  Similar to how he’s fallen from fifth to 11th all-time in homers, he’s now 15th all-time in walks.

His batting average, apparently, was an issue.  Killebrew never hit higher than .288 in a season, and he finished his career at .256.  That, plus the fact that he was viewed as a subpar defender whereever the Twins stashed him, resulted in him waiting four ballots to be elected into the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown.

That fact seems bizarre now.  Killebrew wasn’t an all-or-nothing slugger: he finished in the top 10 in the AL in on-base percentage nine times.  He was incredibly consistent: from 1959-1972, he had an OPS+ of 130 or better every years.   He finished in the top five (but never first or second) in the AL in OPS+ 10 times in a 12-year span (he was right in that same range the other two years, but he was limited to 113 games in 1965 and 100 in 1968).

Killebrew was an 11-time All-Star.  He finished in the top five in MVP balloting six times.  In 1971, he was honored with the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award given to players for integrity on and off the field.

I just wish I had more to offer than the numbers.  By every account, Killebrew is one of the greats off the field as well.  It’s going to be a very sad day when he passes.

Report: Raul Mondesi sentenced to eight years in prison for corruption as mayor of San Cristobal

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Former major league outfielder Raul Mondesi has been sentenced to eight years in prison and fined 60 million pesos for corruption as mayor of San Cristobal in the Dominican Republic, Hector Gomez reports. Mondesi served a six-year term as mayor from 2010-16. He initially ran on the ballot of the Dominican Liberation Party, but switched to the Dominican Revolutionary Party over a year later.

Mondesi, 46, played parts of 13 seasons in the majors for the Dodgers, Blue Jays, Yankees, Diamondbacks, Pirates, Angels, and Braves. He won the NL Rookie of the Year Award in 1994 with the Dodgers, made one All-Star team, and won two Gold Glove Awards. He is the father of the Royals infielder of the same name.

Sherwin Williams is trying to back out of a charitable contribution at Angel Stadium

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The paint company Sherwin Williams created a neat promotion at Angel Stadium. There’s a giant paint can with the brand name in left-center field. If a player hits a ball into the can, Sherwin Williams will donate $1 million to the Angels Baseball Foundation, the Angels’ charity for kids.

Angels outfielder Justin Upton appeared to trigger that charitable contribution when he hit a solo home run to left-center field against Indians closer Cody Allen on Tuesday night. The ball bounced in front of the can and then went in on a hop.

ESPN reports that Sherwin Williams is using a technicality to try and get out of the obligation. Because Upton’s home run didn’t land in the can on the fly, Sherwin Williams is saying they’re not obliged to make the $1 million donation. In 2014, Frazee Paint and the Angels agreed to the paint can promotion and indeed the press release says, “…if an Angels player hits a home run that lands in the can on the fly, the company will make a $1 million donation to benefit the Foundation’s efforts to improve the lives of children in the community.” Frazee Paint is now owned by Sherwin Williams.

According to Forbes, Sherwin Williams is worth $29.2 billion, ranking at 724 on the Global 2000. One would imagine ponying up the relatively minuscule sum of $1 million would be worth it rather than taking the P.R. hit from the dozens of articles that have been and will continue to be written about the company’s pedantry over a charitable donation to needy children.

MLB is currently not allowing the video to be embedded so here’s the link if you want to watch it.