Bartolo Colon declines to discuss stem cell procedure

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Bartolo Colon’s elbow procedure in the Dominican Republic was naturally the topic du jour as he took on the Red Sox last night.

The rejuvenated right-hander topped out at 95.6 mph on his fastball during the outing, which brought out Tweets like this one from Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe.

Colon hitting 96? Those must be some good stem cells.

Colon gave up three runs — two earned — on five hits over six-plus innings while striking out four and walking three in a losing effort.

According to Ian Begley of ESPNNewYork.com, Colon was asked about his elbow procedure after the game, but referred all questions to the players’ union.

“They know the right and wrong of the situation,” Colon said through an interpreter. “They know more so you can get anything that you may need from them.”

I’m a moron when it comes to this sort of thing, but everything I’ve read suggests this procedure wasn’t far off from platelet rich plasma injections, which have become commonplace in recent years. Why didn’t Takashi Saito have to answer these same questions back in 2008? It could be that Colon’s doctor has been connected to HGH in the past, but I also think that “stem cells” remains one of those buzz phrases that gets people all worked up for nothing.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.