The White Sox are going with a six-man rotation

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As has been suggested ever since it became clear that, yes, Jake Peavy was actually coming back, starting tomorrow, the White Sox are going to go with a six-man rotation. Today Brett Ballantini of CSN Chicago has the complete breakdown of the schedule and the White Sox’ starters’ splits on four, five and six days’ rest.  The upshot: everyone except Edwin Jackson does better on extra rest, and Jackson does about the same. Brett also proposes some schedule tweaks that would optimize the number of starts each guy gets on his best rest period (some do better with five days off; others six).

We hear about teams messing with — or at least flirting with — the idea of six-man rotations from time to time, but the White Sox’ experiment is supposed to last a while. Scanning around the web for a few minutes I couldn’t find any comprehensive studies of the beast, so I’m not sure (a) if anyone has used a six-man rotation for a sustained period of time; or (b) if it was useful.  It strikes me that the biggest risk to it all is not what it means for the starters themselves but for roster construction. Are there enough position players on the bench? Will the manager, knowing that his starters are better rested, better-optimize his bullpen use?

It’ll be interesting to watch. And, if the White Sox go on a tear over the next month, will be something we’ll probably see more of.

Report: Momentum in talks between Mariners, Jon Jay

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MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand reports that there is some momentum in talks between the Mariners and free agent outfielder Jon Jay.

Jay, 32, hit .296/.374/.375 in 433 plate appearances with the Cubs last season, which is adequate. He’s heralded more for his defense and his ability to play all three outfield spots.

The Mariners are losing center fielder Jarrod Dyson to free agency and likely don’t want to rely on Guillermo Heredia next season, hence the interest in Jay. The free agent class for center fielders is otherwise relatively weak.