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Carlos Ruiz says Roy Oswalt’s fastball “had no life” Thursday


Roy Oswalt allowed three runs on seven hits during a rough seven-inning rehab start Thursday night for Single-A Clearwater then dipped out of the minor league clubhouse before chatting with reporters.

Why the rush? This tweet from Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer might explain it:

[Carlos] Ruiz said Oswalt’s fastball had no life for most of the start. Off by about 4 mph in general.

Gelb then spoke with a scout, who confirmed that Oswalt did not have his normal fastball velocity. The 33-year-old veteran regularly hits 93 MPH when he’s at his best, but was clocking in between 88-90 MPH on Thursday evening in Florida.

The Phillies were hoping to activate Oswalt from the disabled list in time for a Tuesday night matchup with the Cardinals, but the poor radar gun numbers could certainly lead to a reassessment of that plan.

Oswalt has been sidelined since the last week of April with lower back inflammation. He had a 3.33 ERA, 1.04 WHIP and 21/7 K/BB ratio over his first five starts of the 2011 regular season.

Clayton Kershaw does not need back surgery

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 16:  Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers stands on the pitcher's mound in the sixth inning against the Chicago Cubs during game two of the National League Championship Series at Wrigley Field on October 16, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman says thatClayton Kershaw is unlikely to need back surgery for the herniated disk that sidelined him for more than two months during the season.

Friedman says that Kershaw feels good and that he doesn’t anticipate surgery. It was unclear if that would be the case because, even as Kershaw came back in September and pitched deep into the playoffs, often on short rest, everyone was fairly tight-lipped about how Kershaw was feeling.

For what it’s worth, Kershaw looked sound mechanically, even if was up and down at times in October.

People are paying tens of thousands to get into the World Series

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 24:  Chicago Cubs fans visit Wrigley Field on October 24, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs will face off against the Cleveland Indians in the World Series beginning tomorrow. This will be the Cubs first trip to the series since 1945. The Indians last trip to the series was 1948.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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Ticket prices for the World Series are always ridiculous, but this year things are heading to a whole new ridiculous level.

Now, to be clear, some of the figures you hear are not what will be paid for tickets. The Associated Press has the de rigueur story of ticket holders asking, like, a million dollars for their tickets and ticket seekers willing to give all kinds of in-kind goods and services for a chance to see the Cubs play in Wrigley. A lot of that noise will never amount to any real transaction and, in some cases, will likely end up with someone getting arrested. It’s crazy time, you know.

But even if those million dollar and sex-for-tickets stories end up being more smoke than fire, people will end up paying astronomical prices to get in. Some already are. ESPN’s Darren Rovell reports that someone paid $32,000 on StubHub for 4 seats in the front row by the Cubs visitors dugout for Game 2 at Progressive Field in Cleveland. The prices in Wrigley Field for Games 3, 4 and, if necessary, 5 will likely go higher. There’s a ton of pent-up demand on the part of both Cubs and Indians fans, after all.

Still: trying to imagine how an in-stadium experience, no matter how long someone has been waiting for it, is worth that kind of scratch. Guess it all depends on whether that kind of money constitutes that kind of scratch for a given person.