Tim Wakefield would consider playing for another team

14 Comments

When Tim Wakefield took what was, essentially a year-to-year contract with the Red Sox, and even since that deal expired, it seemed pretty clear that his preference was either to play in Boston or not play at all.  But as Rob Bradford of WEEI reports, that’s not necessarily the case:

Tim Wakefield, who will become the oldest player in Red Sox history to participate in a game with the next pitch he throws, talked Tuesday night about the chance he might play for another organization. “It depends on the situation. I wouldn’t rule it out,” he said prior to the Sox’ game against the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre. “I want to retire a Red Sox, but I’m going to rule that out.”

He said he wasn’t going to go crazy, specifically saying that he wouldn’t move his family — which is based in Florida — way the heck out to Seattle or something. But he did say, when prompted, that sure, Florida or Tampa Bay could be a good fit.

Of course this all seems more theoretical than anything else.  Wakefield turns 45 this summer. He has given up 17 runs on 22 hits in 21 innings so far this year and was no great shakes last year either.  Knuckleballers never really die, but they do fade away and Wakefield seems to be fading.

But I bet he’d rock the Old Timers Game for a couple of decades after he retires. Assuming the Sox have one, which now that I think about it, I don’t believe they do.  Somebody get on that, OK?

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
5 Comments

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.