Earl Weaver, Juan Samuel

Earl Weaver is auctioning off a ton of memorabilia


Whenever I hear about a baseball figure auctioning off stuff I worry that they’re broke or something, but in this day and age it’s more likely that they’re merely trying to simplify their estate plan.  That seems to be the case with longtime Orioles’ manager Earl Weaver, who is auctioning off all kinds of things:

Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver is auctioning off 47 of his treasured keepsakes, including his 1966 World Series ring and jerseys received as gifts from Cal Ripken Jr. and Eddie Murray.The former Baltimore Orioles skipper will earn tens of thousands of dollars from the sale, but Weaver says he doesn’t need the money and isn’t keeping any of it.

“I have four children. They have children, and their children have children,” said Weaver, who turns 81 in August. “I don’t know how to divide whatever memorabilia there is among them.”

The article lists a lot of the things he’s selling and Weaver talks about how, when you have a ton of grandchildren and great grandchildren, most of whom don’t love baseball as much as you do, it’s way easier to simply liquidate the collectibles.

He also says something briefly about remembering the stuff that led to his acquisition of said collectibles, and that resonates with me. I’m not a pack rat. Aside from some baseball cards in the basement I don’t keep much. I don’t begrudge those who are fond of keepsakes, but the memories of people and places in my life are far more valuable to me than the keepsakes themselves.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering: there is no word if Weaver’s auction items include any Terry Crowley cards, books on tomato plants or treatises on team speed.  And if you don’t know why I mention that, I suggest that you use Google to find out.  And if you do, dear God, make sure the volume is down on your computer and that there are no minors within 1000 yards of you when you find what you’re looking for.

Shawn Tolleson becomes a free agent

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The Rangers outrighted reliever Shawn Tolleson off the 40-man roster on Wednesday. Rather than accept the assignment to Triple-A Round Rock, Tolleson has opted to become a free agent, Rangers executive VP of communications John Blake reports.

Tolleson, 28, emerged as a closer for the Rangers in 2015, but his follow-up campaign this year was dreadful. He finished with a 7.68 ERA and a 29/10 K/BB ratio in 36 1/3 innings. He eventually went on the 60-day disabled list with a back injury.

Despite the nightmarish season, it’s easy to see a team deciding to take a flier on Tolleson for the 2017 season.

Indians strongly considering starting Carlos Santana in left field sans DH

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 19:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates after hitting a solo home run in the third inning against Marco Estrada #25 of the Toronto Blue Jays during game five of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 19, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Indians slugger Carlos Santana hasn’t played in the outfield in a major league game since 2012, but the Indians are strongly considering starting him in left field for Game 3 of the World Series at Wrigley Field on Friday, MLB.com’s Jordan Bastian reports. As the game is hosted in a National League park, there is no DH rule in effect, so the Indians might otherwise have to keep Santana on the bench.

Santana is hitless in six at-bats in the World Series thus far, but he has drawn two walks. He has overall not had a great postseason, carrying an aggregate .564 OPS in 40 plate appearances since the beginning of the playoffs. Still, during the regular season, he had an .865 OPS so he can certainly be a threat on offense at any given moment.