Taylor Teagarden hits three homers for Triple-A Round Rock

Leave a comment

In his first game since being sent down by the Rangers, catcher Taylor Teagarden went deep three times and drove in seven runs for the Round Rock Express on Sunday.

The huge game gave him five homers in just 22 at-bats in the PCL this season.

Teagarden showed no rust at all despite a lack of action these last three weeks. He played in just two games, collecting four at-bats, in his 16 days with the Rangers.

Teagarden has flashed plenty of power in the majors, too, having delivered 16 homers and 19 doubles in 320 at-bats with the Rangers over the last four seasons. Unfortunately, all of that power came with 130 strikeouts. Since a nice 47-at-bat debut in 2008, he’s hit just .198 with 10 homers and a 111/23 K/BB ratio the last three seasons.

And that’s why the 27-year-old is back in the minors now. While Teagarden is considered average or above average defensively, teams seem to think his issues making contact will prevent him from becoming a quality regular. The Rangers buried him by bringing in Yorvit Torrealba and Mike Napoli over the winter, and no team has stepped up with a significant enough offer to pry him away.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

Getty Images
14 Comments

Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.