St Louis Cardinals v Los Angeles Dodgers

Let’s make all of the Dodgers free agents

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Now we know this isn’t going to happen. But I thought this would be fun. It’s May 31… the Dodgers miss payroll and MLB, not realizing it, is a few minutes late in stepping in to pay the players. Every Dodger player now has the right to elect free agency.

There’s two thoughts here: first, being the middle of the season, most teams don’t have nearly the financial flexibility that they would in the offseason. Budgets are set and many GMs would have to get creative in making contract proposals to the free agents. Odds are that the non-superstars wouldn’t do as well financially as they would as offseason free agents.

Second, while guys like Casey Blake and Jon Garland could take financial hits, leaving might be preferable to sticking around a Dodgers team suddenly reduced to rubble by key departures. So, I’ll work under the assumption that if it’s close, the player is going to move on.

Now the fun part… who goes where.

Clayton Kershaw – This one is obvious, right? No one is going to outbid the Yankees for Kershaw’s services. At 23 and already a dominant force, having posted a 3.19 ERA in 90 career starts, Kershaw is one of the most valuable properties around and it’s make perfect sense for the Yankees to go all in for him. Still four years away from actual free agency, Kershaw would stand to benefit more than anyone from this chain of events. The injury risk is significant, but I imagine he’d get at least $100 million for six years as a free agent. Prediction: Yankees – six years, $108 million

Matt Kemp – In the midst of a bounce-back season, the 26-year-old Kemp is hitting .352/.423/.566 with six homers and 10 steals in 32 games. Making a modest $6.95 million this year, he’d be extremely attractive if the Dodgers decided to turn him into trade bait. However, I’m not sure who would step up and offer him the $18 million-$20 million he’s worth if he became a free agent. The Yankees (with Kershaw), Phillies, Red Sox and White Sox are pretty much tapped out now. The Nationals would make a lot of sense, given their modest $64 million payroll, but they might be gunshy after just adding Jayson Werth. How about the Royals? They’re spending just $36 million this year, so they can take the money, and for all of their prospects, they’re missing a long-term center fielder. What better way to say they’re serious about contending in the AL Central than by signing Kemp? Prediction: Royals – four years, $76 million

Andre Ethier – A good friend of Dustin Pedroia’s, Ethier has been mentioned as a possible Red Sox target several times, and Boston will be looking for a right fielder for 2012 and beyond. Ethier, though, is poor defensively and might be better off as a long-term first baseman. How about the Nationals sign him and move him to first base once Bryce Harper is ready? If he’d rather join an immediate contender, perhaps he could sign a short-term deal with the Rays or Rangers that would allow him to become a free agent again after 2012. Prediction: Nationals – four years, $56 million

Chad Billingsley – Billingsley just inked a three-year, $33 million extension that would keep him in Los Angeles through 2014. However, he could almost surely do better on the open market with so many teams needing pitching. The Mets and Cubs may not have much flexibility for this year, but with all of the contracts they have coming off the books, they could afford to pay Billingsley $15 million per year starting in 2012. The Orioles should also consider a strong bid. Prediction: Orioles – five years, $75 million

OK, let’s go to the lightning round now. I’ll list players with their current salaries.

Rod Barajas ($3.25 million) – The Red Sox, Royals and Rockies might be tempted by his power and solid glove. He’d probably go.
Casey Blake ($5.25 million) – On the shelf with an elbow infection. Still, with so many teams needing third basemen, he’d likely depart, maybe for San Fran.
Jonathan Broxton ($7 million) – With iffy elbow, he’ll stay put and try to rebuild his value.
Rafael Furcal ($12 million) – A broken thumb means he’ll stay put and wait for free agency at season’s end.
Jon Garland ($5 million) – Vesting option for $8 million if he throws 190 innings. He might prefer to stay and get his money.
Matt Guerrier ($2.25 million) – The Dodgers made the biggest offer over the winter, signing him for $12 million over three years. He’ll stay.
Kenley Jansen ($0.4 million) – Struggled with command this year, but big-time arm. It’d be worth a Guerrier-type deal to control him for the next six years.
Hong-Chih Kuo ($2.275 million) – He’d be a big risk on a long-term deal, but if healthy, he’s a potential difference maker in October. The Red Sox or Yankees would give him a raise.
Hiroki Kuroda ($12 million) – Likes L.A. and passed up long-term deals as a free agent in the offseason. He’ll stay.
Ted Lilly ($7.5 million) – He’s due $25 million between 2012-13. Off to a poor start, he probably wouldn’t match that as a free agent. Stays.
James Loney ($4.875 million) – Would anyone want him? He’s not worth his salary with the way he’s played the last two years.
Vicente Padilla ($2 million) – Looking impressive in his stint as a short reliever. Some other NL team would want him as a setup man.
Jerry Sands ($0.4 million) – Everyone would be interested in a 23-year-old with his power. It’d probably take at least $16 million-$20 million for four years to sign him.
Juan Uribe ($5 million) – No one is going to match the three-year, $21 million the Dodgers gave him over the winter. Stays.

With Adam Jones ailing, Orioles add Borbon to outfield

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 13: Adam Jones #10 of the Baltimore Orioles reacts after being hit in the hand by a pitch in the sixth against the San Francisco Giants inning during an interleague game at AT&T Park on August 13, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK — With star outfielder Adam Jones nursing a tender hamstring, the Baltimore Orioles selected the contract of Julio Borbon from Double-A Bowie and optioned pitcher Mike Wright to Triple-A Norfolk.

Borbon was inserted in the starting lineup for Baltimore, batting ninth against hard-throwing New York Yankees rookie Chad Green.

“We had some other center field options,” manager Buck Showalter said. “Borbon is our best option at this point.”

Jones left Friday’s game in the second inning with a left hamstring strain. He departed the previous night’s game at Washington in the ninth inning with hamstring cramps and aggravated the injury hustling down the first base line on a soft grounder to third.

“I got a feeling that if he hadn’t had that first swinging bunt, it might not have been a problem,” Showalter indicated. “He’s not going to trot to first base as much as I talked to him about it before the game.”

Although Jones was unable to talk his way into Saturday’s lineup, Showalter speculated that he might be available to pinch-hit.

The 30-year old Borbon was 2 for 9 in five games with the Orioles earlier this season, but was designated for assignment on July 26. To create room for Borbon on the 40-man roster, pitcher Logan Ondrusek was designated for assignment on Friday.

No structural damage found in Andrew Benintendi’s knee

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - AUGUST 24:  Shortstop Matt Duffy #5 of the Tampa Bay Rays tags out Andrew Benintendi #40 of the Boston Red Sox after Dustin Pedroia grounded into the double play  during the seventh inning of a game on August 24, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Good news in Boston: An MRI on Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi‘s left knee revealed no structural damage.

Benintendi slipped while trying to avoid a tag at second base, injuring his leg, but it appears he’s avoided a serious injury. A timetable for his return isn’t known at this point, but the Red Sox expect to get him back before the end of the season.

Benintendi is hitting .324/.365/.485 with a homer and ten RBI in 21 games.