Just ten percent of players are given drug tests in the offseason

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Michael S. Schmidt of the New York Times details a report quietly released by Major League Baseball a couple of weeks ago in which it was revealed that, in the 2010 offseason, only 10 percent of major league baseball players were given drug tests. These tests constituted just three percent of all drug tests given by baseball in 2010.

These offseason rates are significantly lower than the offseason rates seen in the NFL and Olympic sports and, given that players’ normal routines involve using the offseason for more intense workouts than they do during the regular season, it represents a pretty big loophole. Both the union and the league told Schmidt that offseason testing is an item on the agenda for the new Collective Bargaining Agreement which will be negotiated this year.

The biggest question I have is, practically speaking, how can you increase this frequency in anything approaching a fair way? Some players live two miles from the team’s spring training headquarters all winter long. Some live in the middle of nowhere, Mississippi. Others live in Japan, the Dominican Republic and Venezuela. Unlike the NFL — in which there are numerous pre-scheduled offseason activities like minicamps — there is no time when ballplayers are truly accessible to their team in such a way as to make offseason drug testing a truly random or even arguably comprehensive thing.

Report: Shohei Ohtani has sprained UCL in pitching elbow

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The Angels signed Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani for a $2.3 million signing bonus last weekend. They may have damaged goods on their hands. Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reports that Ohtani underwent a physical that revealed a first-degree sprain of his ulnar collateral ligament. As a result, he got a platelet-rich plasma injection on October 20. This was made known to teams after Ohtani entered MLB’s posting system, so it wasn’t like the Angels went into this blind.

Ohtani’s report said, “Although partial damage of UCL in deep layer of his right UCL exists, he is able to continue full baseball participation with sufficient elbow care program.” It also said Ohtani “will most likely be available to start his throwing program approximately a month from the PRP.”

Passan notes that the report also mentioned that a “small free body” floats in Ohtani’s elbow near his UCL.

Ohtani isn’t without other injuries. He battled hamstring and ankle issues throughout 2017 and underwent right ankle surgery back in October. Thankfully for the Angels, this diagnosis is about as good as it could be considering the circumstances. However, if Ohtani does exacerbate his UCL issue, he may ultimately need Tommy John surgery at some point, which would take him out of action for at least a year.