Tim Hudson

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

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Braves 8, Brewers 3; Braves 8, Brewers 0: A day the Brewers would like to forget. The Braves scoring eight runs is rare enough, but doing it — in the first game at least — with no homers is even more rare for this station-to-station team. Tim Hudson threw a 102-pitch one-hitter in the nightcap, spoiling Zack Greinke’s Brewers’ debut.  Tim Hudson may be one of the more overlooked awesome pitchers in baseball.  It’s like everyone forgot about him when he went down for Tommy John surgery a few years ago. But since he’s been back: quiet excellence.

Blue Jays 3, Rays 2: Joe West and his crew are a joke.  They tossed Joe Maddon after the ump got together and reversed West’s safe call on a tag play at first by Adam Lind on Sam Fuld, calling him out. Except they had it right the first time. The rest of the game was characterized by a crappy strike zone and multiple ejections when people complained about it. Joe Maddon on Twitter after the game:  “If ever a play screamed for instant replay we saw it at first base in the 7th inning tonight. I think Joe West got it right the first time.” Watch Maddon get fined now while West gets … nothing.  But not everything sucked in this game. Check out this relay throw by Yunel Escobar and plate block by Jose Molina. Mercy.

Giants 2, Mets 0: The Giants discover that you don’t have to fix your offensive woes when Tim Lincecum takes the hill and shuts out the opposition for seven innings while striking out 12. If there was any doubt that Bruce Bochy wanted this one badly it was put to rest when he used four relievers to pitch the final two innings, with three of them getting to retire one batter each and Brian Wilson taking the entire ninth.

Phillies 7, Nationals 4: Vance Worley: the fifth ace. In his second start, Worley allows one over six innings, brining his total to one run allowed in 12 innings on the year.

Pirates 7, Padres 4: Kevin Correia sat in the lotus position and vowed revenge before this game. “For what, Kevin?” asked Clint Hurdle before the game. “You left them via free agency. It’s not like they did you dirty or anything.”  Correia trained an intense look on his manager and then slowly walked away, a lonely pan flute playing in the distance. He knew what he must do (6 IP, 5 H, 2 ER).  As far as revenge goes it was rather mediocre, but a win is a win. Or so said Correia’s sensei before their final battle, which each knew had to end in the death of the vanquished.

For the uninitiated in the ways of And That Happened, now would be a good time to let you know that as the season wears on I find it harder and harder to find interesting things to say about kind of blah teams like the Pirates and Padres, so I go off on these sorts of flights of fancy. Which is to say that, no, I have no real proof that Kevin Corriea killed his sensei. It’s just what a lot of people are saying is all.

Tigers 4, Yankees 0: Max Scherzer blanks the Yankees for eight innings and someone woke Magglio Ordonez up to hit a two-run homer. Derek Jeter leaves with a sore hip. If I were in the situation Jeter’s in I’d probably be happy to have a sore hip right now.

Orioles 3, Royals 2: Luke Scott went two for three with two walks. So he says.

Twins 3, White Sox 2:  The White Sox have lost 17 of 21 games. And I picked them to win the Central. Good thing I’m not a betting man.

Cubs 5, Dodgers 1: Carlos Zambrano gave up one run on five hits over eight innings. And boy, did the Cubs look spiffy in their throwbacks doing it. Check out those socks.  An off-day for Andre Ethier as his elbow is wonky, so the hitting streak counter remains at 29.

Reds 3, Astros 2: I hit this one up yesterday. If the Astros’ closer continues to be Lyon, Astros fans will be dyin’.

Angels 5, Red Sox 3: Two and a half hours of rain delays plus a five hour, thirteen inning game that ended at 2:45 AM? That ended with Daisuke Matsuzaka pitching in relief and giving up a two-run RBI single to Bobby Abreu? Plus a 1:35 PM start today?  Oh yeah!

Rockies 6, Diamondbacks 4: Chris Ianetta had a two-run homer. His line on the year is weird: .188/.388/.453.  Not many hits — 12 — but he has made the most of them, with eight going for extra bases.

Marlins 8, Cardinals 7: A two-run homer from Mike Stanton in the ninth broke a 6-6 tie. He hit it off an Eduardo Sanchez fastball. This a night after Sanchez dusted Stanton with sliders in a key ninth inning matchup. Hey Eduardo: if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Rangers 5, Mariners 2: C.J. Wilson totally handcuffed Seattle, pitching a complete game and striking out 12.

Athletics 3, Indians 1: David DeJesus hadn’t hit any homers all year. In this one he hit two. Overall the A’s only had four hits, but it was enough to stand up for Trevor Cahill, who gave up one run on five hits over seven innings.

Report: Extension talks between Mets, Neil Walker are “probably dead”

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 21: Neil Walker #20 of the New York Mets sits in the dugout before the game against the San Francisco Giants at AT&T Park on August 21, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  The New York Mets defeated the San Francisco Giants 2-0. (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)
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On Sunday, it was reported that second baseman Neil Walker and the Mets were discussing a potential three-year contract extension worth “north of $40 million.” Those discussions took a turn for the worse. The Mets feel extension talks are “probably dead,” according to Mike Puma of the New York Post.

Walker underwent a lumbar microdisectomy in September, ending his 2016 season during which he hit .282/.347/.476 with 23 home runs and 55 RBI over 458 plate appearances.

The Mets may not necessarily need to keep Walker around as it has some potential options up the middle waiting in the minor leagues. Though Amed Rosario is expected to stick at shortstop, Gavin Cecchini — the club’s No. 3 prospect according to MLB Pipeline — could shift over to second base.

Rick Ankiel drank vodka before a start to deal with the yips

9 Apr 2000: Rick Ankiel #66 of the St. Louis Cardinals winds back to pitch the ball during the game against the Milwaukee Brweers at the Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri. The Cardinals defeated the Brewers 11-2. Mandatory Credit: Elsa Hasch  /Allsport
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The story of Rick Ankiel is well known by now. He was a phenom pitcher who burst onto the scene with the Cardinals in 1999 and into the 2000 season as one of the top young talents in the game. Then, in the 2000 playoffs, he melted down. He got the yips. Whatever you want to call it, he lost the ability to throw strikes and his pitching career was soon over. He came back, however, against all odds, and remade his career as a solid outfielder.

It’s inspirational and incredible. But there is a lot more to the story that we’ve ever known. We will soon, however, as Ankiel is coming out with a book. Today he took to the airwaves and shared some about it. Including some amazing stuff:

On drinking in his first start after the famous meltdown in Game One of the 2000 National League division series against the Braves:

“Before that game…I’m scared to death. I know I have no chance. Feeling the pressure of all that, right before the game I get a bottle of vodka. I just started drinking vodka. Low and behold, it kind of tamed the monster, and I was able to do what I wanted. I’m sitting on the bench feeling crazy I have to drink vodka to pitch through this. It worked for that game. (I had never drank before a game before). It was one of those things like the yipps, the monster, the disease…it didn’t fight fair so I felt like I wasn’t going to fight fair either.”

Imagine spending your whole life getting to the pinnacle of your career. Then imagine it immediately disintegrating. And then imagine having to go out and do it again in front of millions. It’s almost impossible for anyone to contemplate and, as such, it’s hard to judge almost anything Ankiel did in response to that when he was 21 years-old. That Ankiel got through that and made a career for himself is absolutely amazing. It’s a testament to his drive and determination.