Tim Hudson

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights


Braves 8, Brewers 3; Braves 8, Brewers 0: A day the Brewers would like to forget. The Braves scoring eight runs is rare enough, but doing it — in the first game at least — with no homers is even more rare for this station-to-station team. Tim Hudson threw a 102-pitch one-hitter in the nightcap, spoiling Zack Greinke’s Brewers’ debut.  Tim Hudson may be one of the more overlooked awesome pitchers in baseball.  It’s like everyone forgot about him when he went down for Tommy John surgery a few years ago. But since he’s been back: quiet excellence.

Blue Jays 3, Rays 2: Joe West and his crew are a joke.  They tossed Joe Maddon after the ump got together and reversed West’s safe call on a tag play at first by Adam Lind on Sam Fuld, calling him out. Except they had it right the first time. The rest of the game was characterized by a crappy strike zone and multiple ejections when people complained about it. Joe Maddon on Twitter after the game:  “If ever a play screamed for instant replay we saw it at first base in the 7th inning tonight. I think Joe West got it right the first time.” Watch Maddon get fined now while West gets … nothing.  But not everything sucked in this game. Check out this relay throw by Yunel Escobar and plate block by Jose Molina. Mercy.

Giants 2, Mets 0: The Giants discover that you don’t have to fix your offensive woes when Tim Lincecum takes the hill and shuts out the opposition for seven innings while striking out 12. If there was any doubt that Bruce Bochy wanted this one badly it was put to rest when he used four relievers to pitch the final two innings, with three of them getting to retire one batter each and Brian Wilson taking the entire ninth.

Phillies 7, Nationals 4: Vance Worley: the fifth ace. In his second start, Worley allows one over six innings, brining his total to one run allowed in 12 innings on the year.

Pirates 7, Padres 4: Kevin Correia sat in the lotus position and vowed revenge before this game. “For what, Kevin?” asked Clint Hurdle before the game. “You left them via free agency. It’s not like they did you dirty or anything.”  Correia trained an intense look on his manager and then slowly walked away, a lonely pan flute playing in the distance. He knew what he must do (6 IP, 5 H, 2 ER).  As far as revenge goes it was rather mediocre, but a win is a win. Or so said Correia’s sensei before their final battle, which each knew had to end in the death of the vanquished.

For the uninitiated in the ways of And That Happened, now would be a good time to let you know that as the season wears on I find it harder and harder to find interesting things to say about kind of blah teams like the Pirates and Padres, so I go off on these sorts of flights of fancy. Which is to say that, no, I have no real proof that Kevin Corriea killed his sensei. It’s just what a lot of people are saying is all.

Tigers 4, Yankees 0: Max Scherzer blanks the Yankees for eight innings and someone woke Magglio Ordonez up to hit a two-run homer. Derek Jeter leaves with a sore hip. If I were in the situation Jeter’s in I’d probably be happy to have a sore hip right now.

Orioles 3, Royals 2: Luke Scott went two for three with two walks. So he says.

Twins 3, White Sox 2:  The White Sox have lost 17 of 21 games. And I picked them to win the Central. Good thing I’m not a betting man.

Cubs 5, Dodgers 1: Carlos Zambrano gave up one run on five hits over eight innings. And boy, did the Cubs look spiffy in their throwbacks doing it. Check out those socks.  An off-day for Andre Ethier as his elbow is wonky, so the hitting streak counter remains at 29.

Reds 3, Astros 2: I hit this one up yesterday. If the Astros’ closer continues to be Lyon, Astros fans will be dyin’.

Angels 5, Red Sox 3: Two and a half hours of rain delays plus a five hour, thirteen inning game that ended at 2:45 AM? That ended with Daisuke Matsuzaka pitching in relief and giving up a two-run RBI single to Bobby Abreu? Plus a 1:35 PM start today?  Oh yeah!

Rockies 6, Diamondbacks 4: Chris Ianetta had a two-run homer. His line on the year is weird: .188/.388/.453.  Not many hits — 12 — but he has made the most of them, with eight going for extra bases.

Marlins 8, Cardinals 7: A two-run homer from Mike Stanton in the ninth broke a 6-6 tie. He hit it off an Eduardo Sanchez fastball. This a night after Sanchez dusted Stanton with sliders in a key ninth inning matchup. Hey Eduardo: if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Rangers 5, Mariners 2: C.J. Wilson totally handcuffed Seattle, pitching a complete game and striking out 12.

Athletics 3, Indians 1: David DeJesus hadn’t hit any homers all year. In this one he hit two. Overall the A’s only had four hits, but it was enough to stand up for Trevor Cahill, who gave up one run on five hits over seven innings.

The international draft is all about MLB making money and the union selling out non-members

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - MARCH 13:  A fan flies the Dominican Republic flag during the game against Cuba during Round 2 of the World Baseball Classic on March 13, 2006 at Hiram Bithorn Stadium in San Juan, Puerto Rico.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
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On Monday we passed along a report that Major League Baseball and the MLBPA are negotiating over an international draft. That report — from ESPN’s Buster Olney — cited competitive balance and the well-being of international free agents as the reasons why they’re pushing for the draft.

We have long doubted those stated motivations and said so again in our post on Monday. But we’re just armchair skeptics when it comes to this. Ben Badler of Baseball America is an expert. Perhaps the foremost expert on international baseball, international signings and the like. Today he writes about a would-be international draft and he tears MLB, the MLBPA and their surrogates in the media to shreds with respect to their talking points.

Of course Badler is a nice guy so “tearing to shreds” is probably putting it too harshly. Maybe it’s better to say that he systematically dismantles the stated rationale for the international draft and makes plan what’s really going on: MLB is looking to save money and the players are looking to sell out non-union members to further their own bargaining position:

Major League Baseball has long wanted an international draft. The driving force behind implementing an international draft is for owners to control their labor costs by paying less money to international amateur players, allowing owners to keep more of that money . . . the players’ association doesn’t care about international amateur players as anything more than a bargaining chip. It’s nothing discriminatory against foreign players, it’s just that the union looks out for players on 40-man rosters. So international players, draft picks in the United States and minor leaguers who make less than $10,000 in annual salary get their rights sold out by the union, which in exchange can negotiate items like a higher major league minimum salary, adjustments to the Super 2 rules or modifying draft pick compensation attached to free agent signings.

Badler then walks through the process of how players are discovered, scouted and signed in Latin America and explains, quite convincingly, how MLB’s international draft and, indeed, its fundamental approach to amateurs in Latin America is lacking.

Read this. Then, every time a U.S.-based writer with MLB sources talks about the international draft, ask whether they know something Ben Badler doesn’t or, alternatively, whether they’re carrying water for either the league or the union.

President Bill Murray speaks about the Cubs from the White House

CHICAGO - APRIL 12:  Celebrity Bill Murray clowns around with Chicago media before the opening day game between the Chicago Cubs and the Pittsburgh Pirates on April 12, 2004 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. The Pirates defeated the Cubs 13-2.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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I don’t know why Bill Murray is in Washington today. I don’t know why he’s at the White House. But I do know that he was there in Chicago Cubs gear, standing at the lectern in the press briefing room, voicing his full confidence in the Cubs prevailing in the NLCS, despite the fact that Clayton Kershaw is going for the Dodgers tomorrow night.

“Too many sticks,” president Murray said of the Cubs lineup. And something about better trees in Illinois.

Four. More. Years.