Counterpoint: Let the courts handle the DUI discipline

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I’m quite sure MLB would be in the business of punishing players accused of DUIs if the MLBPA didn’t stand in the way. But I hardly see how that would be for the best. When Shin-Soo Choo gets busted for driving drunk, that’s not a baseball matter. We have police departments, lawyers and court cases to deal Mr. Choo’s stupidity and reckless behavior. I don’t want Bud Selig putting himself into the middle of it. If Choo drove with a blood-alcohol content at more than twice the legal limit, my feeling is that he deserves some time behind bars and a lengthy license suspension. But I don’t see why he shouldn’t be able to show up to work the next day and go about his business as usual while waiting for judgment.

And as a baseball fan, I don’t like the idea of my team being punished because of a player’s actions off the field. It’d surely hurt Choo to be suspended without pay for 10 days, but it’d probably hurt the Indians more, even working under the assumption that they’d be allowed to replace him on the roster (when players are suspended as a result of on-field actions, they can’t be replaced). Maybe a lesser suspension then? That would only serve to trivialize the charge. The NBA suspends drunk drivers for two games. Does anyone think that’s all a DUI deserves? A slap on the wrist for making the league look bad?

Some are complaining about how Choo will play a day after his charge while Ozzie Guillen gets two games off for tweeting after an ejection. It’s easy: one’s a baseball issue, one isn’t. Maybe MLB will eventually gain the right to dole out punishment for DUIs, but I’d much rather see them focusing on on-field issues than trying to dispense justice for incidents taking place away from the ballpark.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.