Carl Pavano loses to Royals, but defeats garbage can

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Francisco Liriano’s struggles are more extreme and have gotten more attention during the Twins’ awful first month, but Carl Pavano has been plenty terrible himself with a 5.84 ERA through six starts.

More worrisome than the bloated ERA is that Pavano’s strikeout rate continues to plummet, dropping from 7.2 strikeouts per nine innings in 2009 after the Twins acquired him at midseason to 4.8 per nine innings last year and now 4.1 per nine innings this season.

For some context, his rotation-mate Nick Blackburn’s career rate of 4.3 strikeouts per nine innings is dead last among all active MLB pitchers with 500 innings. Pavano, like Blackburn, doesn’t induce enough ground balls to thrive with that few missed bats, particularly with a shoddy defense behind them.

As a pitching staff the Twins have managed just 5.8 strikeouts per nine innings, which is dead last in MLB. Lots of contact plus sub par defense equals runs in bunches. And speaking of lots of contact … Pavano lost to the Royals yesterday, but at least he defeated a trash can in the dugout:

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”