Joe Mauer “finally turning the corner” with leg weakness

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Twins catcher Joe Mauer didn’t reveal much information about his ongoing rehabilitation from bilateral leg weakness and a viral infection on Thursday when he spoke with a group of reporters. But he did acknowledge that he feels like he is “finally turning a corner” and getting close to “increasing the intensity” of his workouts.

Phil Mackey of the Twins Cities’ 1500 AM ESPN has all the goods from the short media session.

Beyond the questions about his current physical condition, Mauer was also asked about a potential position change. It’s something that might keep him healthier long term, but he told the reporters in attendance that it is not yet a topic of discussion:

“To catch. That’s what I want to do. It’s April. We have a lot of games ahead of us. If I come back and I’m not ready to go, I think it’s not fair to my teammates, not fair to the team, to the organization. I have to get ready to go and ready to play. … I just think I can help the team a lot better behind the plate. That’s what I signed here to do — to catch.”

Mauer was 8-for-34 (.235) with four RBI before the weakness and viral infection sidelined him on April 12. Minnesota has been relying on Drew Butera and Steve Holm behind the plate in his absence.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.