That’s just Manny bein’ a high schooler

10 Comments

There’s a neat feature by Sara Rimer over at the New York Times today: an in-depth remembrance of Manny Ramirez as Rimer first saw him: as a baseball-killing high schooler from Washington Heights.

Rimer goes on to explore the essence of MbM, for all of its good and all of its ills.  And as is always the case when I read something in-depth about Manny Ramirez, I can’t decide if there is something much more to the guy than meets the eye or something much less.

The second time he came up, he tapped home plate with his bat, the way you would see him do it later in the majors … Then he called a timeout, taking his right hand off the bat. But the umpire did not give it to him. Everyone who was there swears Manny did not have time to get his right hand back on the bat, that he swung with one hand. I can’t really say that I saw it. Maybe I was too busy taking notes.

The ball went over the left-field fence and all the way to the old handball courts on the street below. It had to be more than 400 feet. His teammates and the fans were screaming: “Oh my God! Oh my God!”

As was the case in his major league career, that other-worldly talent was paired with inscrutable personal habits and motives, most of which seemed to say “I just want to be left alone,” all the while showing a side that seemed to demand attention, whether it was intentional or not.

Call the guy whatever you want. Because really, just about every possible label fits.

Report: Nationals to interview Alex Cora for managerial position

Getty Images
1 Comment

Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe reports that the Nationals will ask to speak with Astros’ bench coach Alex Cora after the American League Championship Series concludes on Saturday. This comes on the heels of the news that club manager Dusty Baker will not be returning to the team in 2018.

Cora, 42, has some experience in the Nationals’ organization. He played for the Nats during his last big league stint in 2011, batting .224/.287/.276 through 91 games before announcing his retirement in the spring of 2012. Per Cafardo, he was also offered a player development gig with the club, but has not appeared in any kind of official role with them since his days as a major league infielder. While he’s been lauded for his leadership skills and strong clubhouse presence, he hasn’t acquired any managerial experience since his retirement, save for a handful of games with the Astros where he filled in for A.J. Hinch.

Despite the appeal of having a familiar face in the dugout, the Nationals aren’t the only ones eyeing Cora. The Astros’ coach has already interviewed with the Tigers, Mets and Red Sox this month. Boston appears to be the current favorite to land him and according to at least one source, may even announce his hiring in advance of the World Series next Tuesday.