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Pittsburgh media already turning on first-year Pirates manager Clint Hurdle?

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Clint Hurdle had to know what a tough job he was taking when he agreed to manage the Pirates. They’d had 18 straight losing seasons and during that time six other managers had tried and failed to turn things around.

Hurdle probably thought he could do what the six before him couldn’t and if not at least he’d be earning around $1 million per year. What he likely didn’t count on was that the mainstream media in Pittsburgh might turn on him three weeks into the job.

Andrew McCutchen made the final out of last night’s loss to the Nationals by unsuccessfully tagging up from third base on a fly out to right field. His run would have merely cut the deficit from 6-3 to 6-4, yet afterward Hurdle declined to blame McCutchen for making a tactical mistake.

Instead he opined that “the only reason that we’re asking that question is because he was out … I bet everybody in the ballpark including [the media] thought we were going to send him.” Or as Pittsburgh Post Gazette columnist Bob Smizik put it, Hurdle “took a small first step toward damaging his credibility in Pittsburgh” and “spoke nonsense.”

Here’s more from Smizik:

If Hurdle really believes that, he’s not as smart as he’s been given credit for being. … It’s baseball 101 and Hurdle knows it. He compounded his malarkey with the following: “That’s going to win us more games than it’s going to cost us.” …

First of all, stupid baseball, which is what the play was,  is not going win more games than it loses. There was no reason–none–to send McCutchen and Hurdle and Leyva know that. Playing aggressively is admirable. But it’s a fine line between being aggressive and being reckless. McCutchen’s play was reckless, particularly since he challenged such a strong throwing arm. If Hurdle is trying to set a tone, he’s setting the wrong one. He’s setting a tone for stupid baseball, not aggressive baseball. … And if Hurdle wants to maintain a semblance of credibility, he shouldn’t treat the fans like they don’t understand the game.

It’s a very long rant, so I had to cut out some sections for the sake of brevity, but you get the idea.

Late Athletics broadcaster Bill King wins the Ford C. Frick Award

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CSN Bay Area
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OXON HILL, MD — Bill King has been selected as the 2017 recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award, presented annually for excellence in broadcasting by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

King, one of the iconic voices of Bay Area sports, was known for his handlebar mustache and his signature “Holy Toledo!” exclamation. King broadcast A’s games for 25 seasons, from 1981 through 2005. He likewise broadcast Oakland Raiders and Golden State Warriors games and got his start as an announcer for the Giants in the late 1950s after they moved to San Francisco.

King passed away in October 2005. With the Frick Award, however, he has now been immortalized among baseball broadcasters.

Rockies sign Ian Desmond for five years, $70 million

ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 07:  Ian Desmond #20 of the Texas Rangers reacts after hitting a double against the Toronto Blue Jays in the seventh inning of game two of the American League Divison Series at Globe Life Park in Arlington on October 7, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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The Rockies have signed free agent outfielder/infielder Ian Desmond for five years and $70 million.

Desmond, 31, played his first season as a full-time outfielder with the Rangers in 2016. Before that he was the Nationals shortstop. He’ll almost certainly be an outfielder in Colorado, or else will play first base, as the Rockies have Trevor Story at short. Desmond hit .285/.335/.446 with 22 home runs, 86 RBI, 107 runs scored, and 21 stolen bases in 677 plate appearances, though he was much, much better in the first half than the second half.

The Rangers had placed a qualifying offer on him which he rejected, so the Rockies will have to give up their first round pick in the 2017 draft, which is 11th overall. That’s the highest pick a team can surrender under the qualifying offer system, as the first ten picks in the draft are protected.