Selig: baseball “moving inexorably” toward a ten-team playoff

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We’ve seen this coming for some time, but Bud Selig today said that baseball is “moving inexorably” toward an expanded playoff beginning with the 2012 season, and said that, while there are details to be worked out, it will likely be a ten-team affair. Specifically, he said “ten is a fair number.” This is a more precise way than he put it last fall when he said “Eight is a fair number. So is ten.”

Not that fairness is the real consideration behind this. If it was they’d just do a 30-team tournament because there’s nothing more fair than that.  No, this is about revenue from highly-rated national playoff games and several hundred thousand more people going through the ballpark turnstiles at playoff ticket prices. It’s also about job security, as anonymous baseball sources have admitted that it’s way better to be able to tell the team’s owner that, hey, they put a playoff team together rather than put a good team together that fell oh so short.

The league wants it. The union doesn’t oppose it.  It’s happening.  I just wish that when people talked about it they didn’t try to convince me that there are baseball, as opposed to business arguments for it. Because there clearly are none.

UPDATE: OK, I’m being overly grumpy. An additional wild card round — which is what Selig suggested, though he doesn’t know its length — will make winning the division a preferable option to winning the wild card and will make it all the harder for a marginal team to win it all.  That is a good baseball reason.  It doesn’t overcome my distaste of it because I hate short series — and God help us if they make it a one-game play-in thing, because that’s just gimmicky — but I’m being a grouch when I say there “clearly are none.”  I just don’t like ’em.

Now get off my lawn.

Steve Delabar among three suspended after testing positive

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Three players were suspended on Monday after testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs. They are: Indians pitcher Steve Delabar, Mariners pitcher Jonathan Aro, and free agent pitcher Jeffry Hernandez. Aro got a 50-game suspension while the other two were handed 80-game suspensions.

Delabar, 33, hasn’t pitched yet this season after signing a minor league deal with the Indians back in January. He spent last year with the Reds as well as the Hiroshima Carp in the Japan Central League. The right-hander has struggled over the last few seasons.

Aro, 26, also hasn’t appeared yet this season in the minors. He’s worked mostly in relief. The right-hander appeared briefly in the majors with the Mariners last season and logged 10 1/3 innings in the show with the Red Sox in 2015. Aro went to the Mariners along with Wade Miley in the trade that brought the Red Sox Carson Smith and Roenis Elias.

Hernandez, 22, is a free agent and his suspension will be effective if and when he signs with a new team.

Phillies place Aaron Nola on the disabled list

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The Phillies announced on Monday that starter Aaron Nola has been placed on the 10-day disabled list, retroactive to April 21, with a lower back strain.

Nola, 23, compiled a 4.50 ERA with a 15/6 K/BB ratio over his first three starts spanning 16 innings. He felt some back soreness during his last start on Thursday against the Mets, and it lingered when he had a side session on Sunday.

CSN Philly’s Jim Salisbury hears that the Phillies are likely to call up Nick Pivetta from Triple-A Lehigh Valley to take Nola’s place in the rotation. Nola was scheduled to start on Wednesday.

Pivetta, 24, was acquired from the Nationals in the Jonathan Papelbon trade in July 2015. At Triple-A so far, Pivetta has given up only two earned runs on 12 hits and two walks with 24 strikeouts in 19 innings.