Jim Palmer thinks Mike Cuellar lost the 1970 Cy Young Award because of racism

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I didn’t watch the Orioles game last night — so someone please tell me if this is inaccurate — but a reader passes along a bit of byplay between Gary Thorne and Hall of Famer Jim Palmer, the color man.  The subject: Mike Cuellar. The issue: why he didn’t win the 1970 Cy Young. Palmer thinks he knows:

Trivia Question: Who was the first Oriole to win the Cy Young Award?

Answer: Mike Cuellar, 1969

Jim Palmer: He should have won two years, 1969 he shared it with Denny McLain, and the next year, how about going 24-8, and you don’t even get a third place vote from one of your beat writers, because you’re not a good interview, because you’re from Cuba and you speak Spanish.

Gary Thorne: Was that the reason given?  Did the writer actually say that?

Palmer: No, but that’s what happened.

Thorne: Oh, okay. Well, I’m not doubting you.

Palmer: 24-8, and you don’t get a third place vote.  Not a second place vote, not a first place vote.  Jim Perry won that year.

Hurm.  Apparently the anti-Cuban bias disappeared for 1969 when Cuellar shared the award with Denny McLain and returned to bite Cuellar the following season.

I’m also sure his snub had nothing to do with the fact that Dave McNally and Palmer himself each also won 20+ games, thereby splitting the vote with their teammate Cuellar in a way that few award votes have ever been so effectively split. Indeed, Palmer himself would have been a better choice than Cuellar that year.

And I’m sure that it had nothing to do with the fact that, won-loss record aside, 1970 was a major step back for Cuellar compared to his 1969 — his ERA was up more than a full run, to a very-average-for-1970 3.48 — and voters often move on to a new face the next year. Especially faces that don’t have the league-leading run support the 1970 Orioles starters had.

Finally, I’m sure it had nothing to with the fact that, quite simply, Jim Perry had a better year than Cuellar did. Perry walked fewer guys, allowed fewer base runners and allowed half-a-run fewer earned runs per game.

Know who really got boned in 1970? Sam McDowell. Dude struck out over 300 guys, pitched more innings, gave up fewer hits and had a lower ERA than Cuellar or Perry. Unfortunately, America had not yet moved beyond its anti-Yinzer prejudice and McDowell — like so many Pennsylvanians before him — suffered because of society’s ignorance.

Palmer may be right that the Baltimore writer he specifically mentioned had something against Cuellar. I have no idea. But it sure as hell didn’t cost him the 1970 Cy Young Award.

The Cubs will try to clinch the NL Central on Tuesday

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The Cubs soundly defeated the Cardinals on Monday night, 10-2, sending their magic number down to one. They will try to clinch the NL Central on Tuesday with another win against the Cardinals. Alternatively, if they lose, they can still clinch if the Brewers also lose on Tuesday.

The Cubs, of course, won the Central last year en route to winning their first World Series since 1908. It wasn’t nearly as easy this year as the club was below .500 entering June and was exactly at .500 entering July. A 16-8 July, 17-12 August, and 15-8 September have helped put the Cubs back in position to return to the postseason.

Not to be forgotten, the Cardinals were eliminated from NL Central contention with Monday’s loss. Now they have their sights set on the second NL Wild Card slot and currently trail the Rockies in that race.

The matchups for Tuesday’s action:

Carter Capps to undergo surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

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Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union Tribune reports that Padres pitcher Carter Capps will undergo surgery this offseason to address thoracic outlet syndrome, which doctors believe caused the right-hander’s blood clots. The Padres hope to have him ready by spring training next year.

Capps, 27, underwent Tommy John surgery last year and didn’t debut this season until August 7. He made 11 relief appearances, yielding nine runs on 12 hits and two walks with seven strikeouts in 12 1/3 innings. He went back on the DL on September 12 due to the blood clot issue.

The Padres acquired Capps from the Marlins last July in the Andrew Cashner trade which ended up having a lot of moving parts. Capps will enter his third and final year of arbitration eligibility this offseason. It’s quite possible the Padres choose to non-tender him.