Did the Cubs throw the 1918 World Series

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This isn’t exactly new — there was a book written about it a couple of years ago — but the Associated Press is circulating the story in light of some of the relevant documents becoming public, so why not:  Did the Cubs throw the 1918 World Series to the Red Sox, inspiring the White Sox to do the same the next year?

The central piece of evidence is a deposition given by Eddie Cicotte in 1920 in which he suggested that the White Sox got the idea to throw the 1919 World Series from the Cubs. It’s all very vague — Cicotte really just talks about how others on the White Sox talked about how some Cubs players were offered money to do it — but it’s an interesting glimpse all the same.  If the subject interests you, I’d suggest the book linked above, as a couple of readers emailed me within the past hour telling me that it’s pretty decent.  The book’s author is quoted in the AP report.

And if the Cubs did throw the series? Given that the Black Sox did it again the next year and set in motion the new rules of baseball that cracked down on gambling, the Cubs’ legacy of baseball grifting is more a point of ancient history than anything of lasting significance. After all, people don’t talk about 1919 being awful because of how the Cincinnati Reds’ title was sullied. It’s all about the integrity of the game and the changes it brought about. In that respect, it was a travesty for a year, even if it was unknown, but then superseded in significance by the acts of their southside counterparts.

Although, man, if this was discovered before the Red Sox won it all in 2004, it’s possible that Yankees fans would have taken to chanting “1916!” instead of “1918!” to taunt the Bosox. Assuming 1916 wasn’t fixed too.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.