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And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Brewers 9, Phillies 0: Roy Halladay threw 123 pitches in his last start and got tattooed for six runs on ten hits in this one. Coincidence?  Randy Wolf returns to his old stomping grounds (stamping grounds? Can we get a ruling on this) to shut down his old mates (6 IP, 2 H, 0 ER). Well, he left after 2006, so at least some of them are his old mates.

Blue Jays 6, Yankees 5: Mariano Rivera was handed a two-run lead in the ninth inning and … he blew it. A leadoff double followed by a wild pitch brought the Jays to within one and then a walk and two singles later — one of them a bunt single — and it was all tied up. A Travis Snider RBI double in the 10th ended it.  I suppose this sort of thing happens from time to time. Probably doesn’t matter. According to very reliable sources, the machines became self-aware just after 8PM last night, so the attack on humanity begins tomorrow. It’s good to know that both Rivera and Halladay are humans, so at least they’re on our side.

Angels 15, Rangers 4:  The Angels’ young bats break out in a major way. Mark Trumbo homered and drove in four runs, Hank Conger had two hits and scored twice and Peter Bourjos had four hits, including a homer among his four hits. Colby Lewis got rocked in his first start back following a missed turn due the to birth of his second child. More on that a bit later this morning.

Mariners 13, Tigers 3: Man there were a lot of blowouts yesterday. This one was pretty surprising given how inept the Mariners have been on offense. But when the opposition walks you 11 times — 11! — you’re going to score a bunch. Jack Wilson got three of those walks. How do you not throw strikes to Jack Wilson?

Rays 2, White Sox 1: A complete game for James Shields, who gave up a run on four hits and struck out nine. And he wasn’t messin’ around either. He threw 105 pitches and the game took two hours and twelve minutes. The Sox have lost six in a row and the Rays have won seven of eight.

Athletics 5, Red Sox 0: Brett Anderson (8 IP, 4 H, 0 ER 8K) shut down the Sox who — and I’m not making excuses for ’em, just stating facts — had to wake up early on Monday for that Patriots’ Day game then fly out to the west coast for a night game last night. How are you not jet lagged after that? John Lackey didn’t pitch poorly, but when you don’t score …

Orioles 11, Twins 0: You’re Ron Gardenhire. You take a beating like this and you think, hey, silver lining time: I got a closer who can’t close anymore and I need to build his confidence back up. We’re down 8-0, so let’s put Joe Nathan in to get a zero-leverage inning under his belt and get him on the way back to being productive, OK?  Nathan comes in in the eighth and gives up a three-run bomb to Vlad Guerrero. Oof.

Marlins 6, Pirates 0: Josh Johnson was masterful once again, shutting out the Pirates on two hits over seven innings. He’s now 3-0 with a 1.00 ERA, he has a 27/6 K/BB ratio in 27 innings and opposing hitters are batting .112 against him.

Astros 6, Mets 1: Wandy Rodriguez’s first three starts were bad-good-bad, so he was due for “good,” right? (note: never take me to Las Vegas because I don’t understand how the world works). Rodriguez stymied the Mets, who have lost 11 of 13. Second baseman Justin Turner — new deck chair on the SS Mets — was 1 for 4 in his season debut.

Braves 10, Dodgers 1: The Braves explode against the Dodgers’ bullpen, putting up eight runs in the top of the ninth. Eric Hinske pinch hit that inning and, since they batted around, had both a homer and an RBI single. Not bad considering Braves pinch hitters had entered the game hitless on the year. Six two-hit shutout innings for Brandon Beachy.

Diamondbacks 5, Reds 4: Two homers for Ryan Roberts, who wasn’t even supposed to start. Thanks Melvin Mora’s sore foot!  The Reds have lost five of six, mostly because of bad starting pitching.

Royals 5, Indians 4: Kansas City jumped out to a 5-0 lead and nearly blew it as the Tribe scored four over the final three frames. Bruce Chen has now won seven straight decisions stretching back to last year.

Giants 6, Rockies 3: Ubaldo Jimenez’s return didn’t go much better than his debut, giving up four runs on six hits in five innings. A three-run homer for Pablo Sandoval.

Padres vs. Cubs: POSTPONED:  You can dream the American Dream, but you sleep with the lights on and wake up with a scream. You can hope against hope that nothing will change. Grab a hold of that fistful of rain. Grab a hold, grab a hold, grab a hold. Grab a hold, grab a hold, grab a hold of that fistful of rain.

Nationals vs. Cardinals POSTPONED: See the sky about to rain, broken clouds and rain. Locomotive, pull the train, whistle blowing through my brain.

Video: Holliday’s home run a fitting goodbye for Cardinals

ST. LOUIS, MO - SEPTEMBER 30: Matt Holliday #7 of the St. Louis Cardinals hits a solo home run against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the seventh inning at Busch Stadium on September 30, 2016 in St. Louis, Missouri.  (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
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If tonight was his last night in a Cardinals uniform, Matt Holliday made the most of it.

After sitting out most of the second half with a fractured thumb, the 36-year-old was activated from the disabled list on Friday and slotted in as a pinch-hitter during the seventh inning of the Cardinals’ 7-0 shutout. What happened next could hardly have elicited more sentiment had it been scripted:

The solo shot was Holliday’s first home run as a pinch-hitter, and his first home run of any kind since August 9. The triumphant moment might have been the last of its kind in St. Louis, as it was reported earlier today that the Cardinals do not plan to exercise Holliday’s option in 2017.

Prior to the game, the left fielder released a statement in which he expressed his gratitude for the past eight seasons with the Cardinals’ organization:

I would like to thank Mr. Dewitt, Mo and the entire ownership group for the opportunity to play for the St. Louis Cardinals.

I am proud of what we have accomplished on and off the field during the past seven years. I have also been humbled by the incredible support and participation in our Homers for Health program.

It has been an honor to play in front of such great fans and for such a historic organization. I can honestly say it has been a dream come true.

While I’m disappointed this could be it here in St. Louis, I understand that it might be time to move on.

I’d like to express my love and admiration for Tony, Mike and all of the coaches and staff that I have had the pleasure to do life with these past seven-plus years.

The most emotional part of this is my teammates and the relationships I’ve built with some of these guys over the years. Particularly, Adam and Yadi, to be considered part of the core with two of the finest human beings I’ve ever known.

Finally, I’m eternally thankful for the Lord bringing me to the city of St. Louis in August of 2008. Lots of cool stuff has happened since then. On behalf of my wife Leslee and our children Jackson, Ethan, Gracyn and Reed: Thank you!

Angel Pagan body-slammed a fan on the field

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 13: Angel Pagan #16 of the San Francisco Giants argues with umpire Jerry Meals #41 after a called third strike during the first inning against the San Diego Padres at AT&T Park on September 13, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)
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Don’t interrupt Angel Pagan in the middle of a wild card race. Better yet, don’t interrupt him at all.

A fan learned that the hard way during Friday’s Giants-Dodgers game. In the fourth inning, a group of fans ran onto the field with white flowers in their hands, presumably to hand to Giants players. According to eyewitness accounts, one player was reprimanded by San Francisco starter Madison Bumgarner, while Buster Posey fended off another.

Angel Pagan, however, took more extreme and inventive measures.

On-field security started closing in on the fan as he approached Pagan, but didn’t appear to pick up the pace until the outfielder dropped him on the field.

Vin Scully, who was wrapping up the third-to-last game of his career, provided play-by-play of the incident.

A couple of kids, trying to steal a moment, slow down the game, running on the field and just taking a big moment on the big stage. They’ve got one of them in right field, and the other one is nailed down by Pagan in left field. And the crowd loved that! They went up to do something with Angel Pagan, but [Pagan] grabbed him and slammed him to the ground, and they’re taking him off the field. […] Doesn’t that bring you back to the ’60s, and the flower children? Oh what, you don’t remember the ’60s? Okay.

The next time you want to send a message to a player, maybe try a tweet (throw in a flower emoji or two if you feel so inclined). Just don’t make a showy display of affection in the middle of a game. It’s bound to go badly, at least where Angel Pagan is concerned.