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And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Brewers 9, Phillies 0: Roy Halladay threw 123 pitches in his last start and got tattooed for six runs on ten hits in this one. Coincidence?  Randy Wolf returns to his old stomping grounds (stamping grounds? Can we get a ruling on this) to shut down his old mates (6 IP, 2 H, 0 ER). Well, he left after 2006, so at least some of them are his old mates.

Blue Jays 6, Yankees 5: Mariano Rivera was handed a two-run lead in the ninth inning and … he blew it. A leadoff double followed by a wild pitch brought the Jays to within one and then a walk and two singles later — one of them a bunt single — and it was all tied up. A Travis Snider RBI double in the 10th ended it.  I suppose this sort of thing happens from time to time. Probably doesn’t matter. According to very reliable sources, the machines became self-aware just after 8PM last night, so the attack on humanity begins tomorrow. It’s good to know that both Rivera and Halladay are humans, so at least they’re on our side.

Angels 15, Rangers 4:  The Angels’ young bats break out in a major way. Mark Trumbo homered and drove in four runs, Hank Conger had two hits and scored twice and Peter Bourjos had four hits, including a homer among his four hits. Colby Lewis got rocked in his first start back following a missed turn due the to birth of his second child. More on that a bit later this morning.

Mariners 13, Tigers 3: Man there were a lot of blowouts yesterday. This one was pretty surprising given how inept the Mariners have been on offense. But when the opposition walks you 11 times — 11! — you’re going to score a bunch. Jack Wilson got three of those walks. How do you not throw strikes to Jack Wilson?

Rays 2, White Sox 1: A complete game for James Shields, who gave up a run on four hits and struck out nine. And he wasn’t messin’ around either. He threw 105 pitches and the game took two hours and twelve minutes. The Sox have lost six in a row and the Rays have won seven of eight.

Athletics 5, Red Sox 0: Brett Anderson (8 IP, 4 H, 0 ER 8K) shut down the Sox who — and I’m not making excuses for ’em, just stating facts — had to wake up early on Monday for that Patriots’ Day game then fly out to the west coast for a night game last night. How are you not jet lagged after that? John Lackey didn’t pitch poorly, but when you don’t score …

Orioles 11, Twins 0: You’re Ron Gardenhire. You take a beating like this and you think, hey, silver lining time: I got a closer who can’t close anymore and I need to build his confidence back up. We’re down 8-0, so let’s put Joe Nathan in to get a zero-leverage inning under his belt and get him on the way back to being productive, OK?  Nathan comes in in the eighth and gives up a three-run bomb to Vlad Guerrero. Oof.

Marlins 6, Pirates 0: Josh Johnson was masterful once again, shutting out the Pirates on two hits over seven innings. He’s now 3-0 with a 1.00 ERA, he has a 27/6 K/BB ratio in 27 innings and opposing hitters are batting .112 against him.

Astros 6, Mets 1: Wandy Rodriguez’s first three starts were bad-good-bad, so he was due for “good,” right? (note: never take me to Las Vegas because I don’t understand how the world works). Rodriguez stymied the Mets, who have lost 11 of 13. Second baseman Justin Turner — new deck chair on the SS Mets — was 1 for 4 in his season debut.

Braves 10, Dodgers 1: The Braves explode against the Dodgers’ bullpen, putting up eight runs in the top of the ninth. Eric Hinske pinch hit that inning and, since they batted around, had both a homer and an RBI single. Not bad considering Braves pinch hitters had entered the game hitless on the year. Six two-hit shutout innings for Brandon Beachy.

Diamondbacks 5, Reds 4: Two homers for Ryan Roberts, who wasn’t even supposed to start. Thanks Melvin Mora’s sore foot!  The Reds have lost five of six, mostly because of bad starting pitching.

Royals 5, Indians 4: Kansas City jumped out to a 5-0 lead and nearly blew it as the Tribe scored four over the final three frames. Bruce Chen has now won seven straight decisions stretching back to last year.

Giants 6, Rockies 3: Ubaldo Jimenez’s return didn’t go much better than his debut, giving up four runs on six hits in five innings. A three-run homer for Pablo Sandoval.

Padres vs. Cubs: POSTPONED:  You can dream the American Dream, but you sleep with the lights on and wake up with a scream. You can hope against hope that nothing will change. Grab a hold of that fistful of rain. Grab a hold, grab a hold, grab a hold. Grab a hold, grab a hold, grab a hold of that fistful of rain.

Nationals vs. Cardinals POSTPONED: See the sky about to rain, broken clouds and rain. Locomotive, pull the train, whistle blowing through my brain.

2016 Winter Meetings Preview

NATIONAL HARBOR, MD - FEBRUARY 26: The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center is seen along the Potomac River February 26, 2014 in National Harbor, Maryland.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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The baseball world will descend on Washington D.C. — well, the Maryland suburbs of Washington, at the Gaylord Resort at National Harbor — this weekend for the 2016 Winter Meetings. There’s a lot of work to be done.

Twenty free agents from a class of 191 have signed thus far. Among the notable: Yoenis Cespedes, Edinson Volquez, Neil Walker, Josh Reddick, Bartolo Colon, and R.A. Dickey. That, of course, leaves a ton of notables left, including Edwin Encarnacion, Justin Turner, Joe Bautista, Aroldis Chapman, Kenley Jansen, Mark Trumbo, Mark Melancon, Rich Hill and a host of others. Here is our rundown of this offseason’s top free agents if you’re curious. As you have come to expect from us, we’ll have a writeup of everyone who signs, faster than almost anyone else will.

Despite the sheer number of available free agents, this is an historically thin free agent class in terms of talent. That means that, for a team to improve significantly, they may be better served by making a trade. We’ve seen a couple already, most notably the deals which sent Taijuan Walker to the Diamondbacks, Jaime Garcia to the Braves and Brian McCann to the Astros. Most experts believe there will be plenty more this winter, and the ball could really get rolling on that in the next week with guys like Andrew McCutchen, Chris Sale, Chris Archer, Jay Bruce, Curtis Granderson and Brandon Phillips on the block.

Another major activity of the Winter Meetings is the Hall of Fame Veterans Committee vote. Except, this year, there is no Veterans Committee, at least in name. It’s now the “Today’s Game” committee. Here are links to breakdowns of the candidacies of all ten men on the ballot the new committee will consider:

Harold Baines
Albert Belle
Will Clark
Orel Hershiser
Mark McGwire
George Steinbrenner
Davey Johnson
Lou Piniella
John Shuerholz
Bud Selig

Trade deals, free agent negotiations and Hall of Fame votes take place behind closed doors at the Gaylord Resort. One of the major public activities of the Winter Meetings is when all 30 of the managers meet and greet the press. This year’s new faces are Torey Lovullo with the Diamondbacks, Rick Renteria with the White Sox and Bud Black with the Rockies. Brian Snitker, now the permanent manager of the Braves, will get his first go-around at the managerial cattle call. I’ll be in the scrum for a lot of these guys — they do them two at a time so I can’t see everyone — and will let you know if they say anything fun.

Outside of the transactions and the Hall of Fame stuff, we have the more mundane Winter Meetings business. And a lot of it. Indeed, the vast majority of the people at the Meetings aren’t there for transactions. They’re there to network, seek jobs and discuss the business of baseball like any other industry convention. Ever year we hear about a rule change or a proposal for future rule changes at the Meetings, though this year’s brand new Collective Bargaining Agreement should overshadow that. We’ve already discussed the major points of that and, yesterday, I speculated that, as time goes on, the way this agreement was reached could lead to some serious strife going forward, particularly on the union side. Expect to hear some anonymous rumblings about all of that in the next few days, from players, agents and other interested parties who may not be all that pleased with how it goes.

The final event of the Winter Meetings is the Rule 5 Draft, which will take place at 8am on Thursday morning. You likely have no idea who most of the players who will be selected are, but here’s a good place to start your research on that. If your team takes someone in the draft, the most important thing to know is that he’ll either be on the big league roster all year or he’ll have to be returned to his original team. Well, they could be stashed on the disabled list with phantom injuries so they won’t have to be returned, but no team would ever do that, would they? Perish the thought.

So, yes, there’s a lot to be done. I’ll be on the scene at National Harbor, bringing you all the best hot stove business we have to offer and, as usual, some more fun odds and ends from baseball’s biggest offseason event. As they used to say in radio, tune in to us and rip off the dial. Or, at the very least, keep a tab open to us and refresh a lot.

The Padres non-tendered RHP Tyson Ross

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 04:  Tyson Ross #38 of the San Diego Padres walks off the field as he's taken out of the game in the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers on opening day at PETCO Park on April 4, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
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Per a report by MLB.com’s AJ Cassavell, the Padres non-tendered right-handed starter Tyson Ross on Friday, cutting loose their top ace after three seasons with the club.

Ross, 29, was sidelined for the bulk of the season with inflammation in his right shoulder and underwent thoracic outlet surgery in October. His injuries limited him to only 5 1/3 innings in 2016, during which he gave up seven runs and struck out five in a 15-0 blowout against the Dodgers.

Prior to his lengthy stint on the disabled list, the right-hander earned 9.5 fWAR and pitched to a 3.07 ERA and 9.2 K/9 rate in three full seasons with the Padres. He avoided arbitration with a one-year, $9.625 million deal prior to the 2016 season after leading the league with 33 starts and delivering a 3.26 ERA and career-best 4.4 WARP over 196 innings in 2015.

The Padres appear open to bringing Ross back to San Diego, reported Cassavell, albeit not at such a steep cost. Cassavell quoted Padres’ GM A.J. Preller, who was reportedly in trade talks involving Ross but unable to strike a deal, likely due to the right-hander’s recent health issues. Preller denied that those same health issues factored into the club’s decision to non-tender their ace.

With the move, Ross became one of 35 major leaguers to enter free agency on Friday.