The guy who composed “da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” is suing everyone

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Good rule to live by in this world: someone owns just about everything. For example, you know that “”da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” thing they play at every ballgame? Well …

What you might not know is that a Pompano Beach man says he composed it — and says he is entitled to compensation every time it airs publicly. Bobby Kent, 62, holds a copyright for the song, a 26-measure piece he dubbed Stadium Doodads in the late 1970s. The last part of the song is the popular rally cry.

He’s suing the licensing company that sold the rights to it to sports teams, claiming they haven’t paid him his royalties. And he’s suing the sports teams too. Except the Lakers. They settled with him for $3,000.

Of course, it’s not all that simple: others claim that Bobby Kent didn’t write it himself, and that the USC Marching Band has been using it since the 1950s. Which, if I understand copyright law correctly, somehow requires that Fleetwood Mac be brought into this case too (Note: I don’t understand copyright law. But I do like to listen to “Tusk” a lot because it tends to annoy everyone).

Anyway, there’s no word at press time if Kent is going to recruit the estate of Gioachino Rossini and the guy who came up with this thing to turn this into a “charge!” class action.  And of course, Gary Glitter is unavailable for comment. If he were available, however, he’d likely say “Hey!”

Dodgers designate Sergio Romo for assignment

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The Dodgers announced on Thursday that the club activated pitcher Grant Dayton from the 10-day disabled list and designated pitcher Sergio Romo for assignment.

Dayton, 29, went on the disabled list earlier this month with neck stiffness. He’ll resume with a 3.63 ERA and a 20/12 K/BB ratio in 22 1/3 innings.

Romo, 34, signed a one-year, $3 million deal with the Dodgers in February. It didn’t really work out, as the right-hander posted a 6.12 ERA with a 31/12 K/BB ratio in 25 innings. His peripherals are still decent, so it wouldn’t be surprising if a team in need of a bullpen arm makes a deal with the Dodgers within the week.

Nate Karns underwent season-ending surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

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MLB.com’s Jeffrey Flanagan reports that Royals pitcher Nate Karns underwent surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome on Wednesday. He’s expected to be ready for spring training next year. Karns went on the disabled list in May with an elbow injury and didn’t make much progress.

The Royals acquired Karns from the Mariners in January in exchange for outfielder Jarrod Dyson. Over eight starts and one relief appearance, the 29-year-old right-hander compiled a 4.17 ERA and a 51/13 K/BB ratio in 45 1/3 innings.

Karns will enter his first of three years of arbitration eligibility after the season, so he’ll be under the Royals’ control through 2020.