Going to a Nats game? You may want to have alternative transportation plans if it runs late

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I lived in the D.C. area for three years and one of the things I loved the most about it was Metro. As far as subway systems go it’s clean, easy-to-navigate and altogether swell.  The only problem — which was way bigger for me when I was 23 than it would be now — is that it closes at around midnight, so if you’re going to a late show or event, you’re on your own for the ride home.

Most Washington Nationals games end well before midnight, but some don’t. Rain delays. Extended extra-inning affairs.  For those sorts of contingencies, the city of Washington pays Metro overtime to run late to accommodate the baseball crowd. But that may not last:

During past seasons, the city covered the costs of bringing in extra trains if there was a long rain delay or an epic 18-inning contest that caused a game to end past Metro’s normal operating hours. But that agreement is unique. All of the other sports teams and concert venues in our area pay Metro for any late-night service. Council Member Tommy Wells says he would like to see the Nationals pick up the tab, which Metro says costs $90,000 per hour.

This service benefits the Nationals first and foremost. Having it there encourages and allows their fans to come to the ballpark in comfort, allows them so buy hot dogs and beer and big foam fingers, knowing that they have a ride home.  I can’t see why the Nationals shouldn’t pay for late service like everyone else does.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.