In need of offense, Dodgers call up top prospect Jerry Sands

5 Comments

After barely eeking out a 2-1 win over the Cardinals on Sunday to avoid a four-game sweep at home, the Dodgers made a move to address their hitting problems Monday, calling up top prospect Jerry Sands from Triple-A Albuquerque.

Sands, 23, was one of the PCL’s hottest hitters in the early going, having already homered five times.  He was batting .400/.422/.875 with just three strikeouts in 10 games.  He drove in 17 runs all by himself.  The Dodgers, meanwhile, have scored 43 runs in 16 games.

With Sands up, the Dodgers will move away from the Tony Gwynn Jr.-Marcus Thames-Xavier Paul grabbag in left field.  Gwynn had been getting most of the playing time, but he was htiting just .256/.293/.359 in 39 at-bats.  Thames was doing better, but he’s a liability defensively.  Hopefully the club will give him starts at first base against left-handers, as James Loney was awful this spring and is only getting worse.  Paul was designated for assignment to make room on the roster for Sands.

Sands will be making his major league debut.  The 2008 25th-round pick opened last year in low-A ball, but he ended up finishing it at Double-A and hitting 35 homers along the way.  He projects as a 25-homer guy for the Dodgers, though he probably won’t hit for strong averages anytime soon.  Regardless, it’s the right move for the Dodgers to give him a try.  No one else was likely to step up and become an everyday guy for them.

Who is the fastest sprinter in baseball?

Getty Images
3 Comments

We’re not talking the 100 meters here. We’re talking practical baseball sprinting. That’s defined by the StatCast folks at MLB as “feet per second in a player’s fastest one-second window,” while sprinting for the purposes of, you know, winning a baseball game.

StatCast ranked all players who have at least 10 “max effort” runs this year. I won’t give away who is at the top of this list, but given that baseball’s speedsters tend to get a lot of press you will not be at all surprised. As for the bottom of the list, well, the Angels don’t pay Albert Pujols to run even when he’s not suffering from late career chronic foot problems, so they’ll probably let that one go. I will say, however, that I am amused that the third slowest dude in baseball is named “Jett,” however.

Lately people have noticed some odd things about home run distances on StatCast, suggesting that maybe their metrics are wacko. And, of course, their means of gauging this stuff is proprietary and opaque, so we have no way of knowing if their numbers are off the reservation or not. As such, take all of the StatCast stuff you see with a grain of salt.

That said, even if the feet-per-second stuff is wrong here, knowing that Smith is faster than Jones by a factor of X is still interesting.

Here are the final All-Star voting results before the close of balloting

Getty Images
5 Comments

All-Star voting ends this Thursday night, just before midnight eastern time. The All-Star teams — at least how they’ll appear before the dozen or two substitutions we’ll get before the game — will be unveiled on Sunday at 7pm on ESPN, just before Sunday Night Baseball.

Which means you still have time to alter these standings, which now stand as the final update before things are set in, well, not stone, but at least some Play-Doh which has been left out of the can too long and is kinda hard to mess with.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE