Frank McCourt takes a $30 million loan from FOX in order to meet payroll

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FOX used to own the Dodgers. At this rate, they’re going to own them again someday soon:

Frank McCourt took a $30-million loan this week from Fox to meet the Dodgers’ payroll obligations, according to three people briefed on the arrangement. The arrangement is expected to cover the Dodgers’ expenses into next month … The loan marks the second time since the end of last season that Fox has provided money to the Dodgers’ owner so he could cover expenses. The loan was furnished to McCourt personally rather than to the Dodgers, according to the people briefed on the deal.

And because it was a personal loan, it did not require the approval of Major League Baseball.  Baseball is still mulling, however, whether it will allow McCourt to settle his legal problems by taking a big chunk of cash from a new TV right deal for Dodgers telecasts on FOX and diverting it to Jamie McCourt and whoever the hell else Frank owes money too.

If I’m Bud, I wait this out. If he’s taking month-to-month personal loans to cover payroll, Frank is going to go bankrupt very soon and he’ll be forced to sell the Dodgers like Tom Hicks did. Sure, it may not be fabulous to have a marquee franchise in bankruptcy court, but as the Rangers showed, the process is survivable. And, once free from McCourt, the Dodgers could easily become a lucrative property once again.

Report: Momentum in talks between Mariners, Jon Jay

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MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand reports that there is some momentum in talks between the Mariners and free agent outfielder Jon Jay.

Jay, 32, hit .296/.374/.375 in 433 plate appearances with the Cubs last season, which is adequate. He’s heralded more for his defense and his ability to play all three outfield spots.

The Mariners are losing center fielder Jarrod Dyson to free agency and likely don’t want to rely on Guillermo Heredia next season, hence the interest in Jay. The free agent class for center fielders is otherwise relatively weak.