So the Dodgers can’t throw at guys anymore?

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Buster Posey was plunked twice yesterday and he wasn’t happy about it. Nor would I be, of course. It has to hurt. And if it’s not accidental it’s just lame. I hate plunkings and beanball wars. It’s dangerous stuff and, though it always has been and always will be part of baseball, I wish it wasn’t.

But I find this take on it from Andrew Baggarly of the Mercury-News to be a bit odd:

Am I the only one who remembered the display from Monday’s game, when players from both sides stood together and decried senseless acts of violence? Apparently, the Dodgers forgot the message … If Lilly was taking aim at Posey, then the Dodgers were dumb to be seeking revenge. And worse, they were deaf to the tone these two clubs attempted to set just two days earlier.

It seems to me that you either think it’s OK to plunk guys or you don’t. If you don’t, there are no circumstances under which you’d approve of Posey getting hit intentionally, so Baggarly’s extended explanation of why this particular plunking was wrong is beside the point.

If you do think that it’s OK to throw at someone — and Baggarly’s explanation of the circumstances suggests that he thinks that there is a time and a place for it, just not here —  I’m not sure how the Bryan Stow stuff and the anti-violence message enters into it, because that seems to be a totally different thing altogether. That business is about fan behavior and not taking the rivalry outside-the-lines. It’s not about in-game tactics and aggression.

If it was, then we probably need to revisit a lot of other stuff. Like takeout slides at second and plowing into the catcher at home.  Baggarly isn’t suggesting we do that, is he?

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”