So the Dodgers can’t throw at guys anymore?

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Buster Posey was plunked twice yesterday and he wasn’t happy about it. Nor would I be, of course. It has to hurt. And if it’s not accidental it’s just lame. I hate plunkings and beanball wars. It’s dangerous stuff and, though it always has been and always will be part of baseball, I wish it wasn’t.

But I find this take on it from Andrew Baggarly of the Mercury-News to be a bit odd:

Am I the only one who remembered the display from Monday’s game, when players from both sides stood together and decried senseless acts of violence? Apparently, the Dodgers forgot the message … If Lilly was taking aim at Posey, then the Dodgers were dumb to be seeking revenge. And worse, they were deaf to the tone these two clubs attempted to set just two days earlier.

It seems to me that you either think it’s OK to plunk guys or you don’t. If you don’t, there are no circumstances under which you’d approve of Posey getting hit intentionally, so Baggarly’s extended explanation of why this particular plunking was wrong is beside the point.

If you do think that it’s OK to throw at someone — and Baggarly’s explanation of the circumstances suggests that he thinks that there is a time and a place for it, just not here —  I’m not sure how the Bryan Stow stuff and the anti-violence message enters into it, because that seems to be a totally different thing altogether. That business is about fan behavior and not taking the rivalry outside-the-lines. It’s not about in-game tactics and aggression.

If it was, then we probably need to revisit a lot of other stuff. Like takeout slides at second and plowing into the catcher at home.  Baggarly isn’t suggesting we do that, is he?

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.