UPDATE: Ryan Madson and his wife clarify the “I hate the fans” thing

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UPDATE:  The Phillies have issued a statement on behalf of Ryan Madson and his wife, arising out of that business in which the Naked Philadelphian blog reported Sarah Madson to have said “I hate fans” and complain about women coming up to Ryan Madson in public:

Sarah did not consent to an interview, but rather was approached by Ms. Goldman who did not identify herself as a reporter.  She began to ask many personal questions about the life of a wife of a professional baseball player.  The comments reported by Ms. Goldman were taken completely out of context, and as a result, Sarah is extremely upset and feels violated by the situation.

Sarah says, “For every one fan that may upset us, there are 99 Phillies fans that we love. We have lived here for years, have many friends, neighbors and acquaintances — who also happen to be Phillies fans — for whom we have the utmost respect.”

The Madsons would like to dispel this misleading information which indicates that they have anything but admiration for the fans in Philadelphia.

Quotes being “taken out of context” is a difficult topic. Most of the time when it’s deployed in a public statement like this, it means “I said it, but I had no idea it would create such a stir.”  At the same time, if the blogger did just sidle up to Ms. Madson and start talking without identifying herself as a reporter of any kind, there is a contextual issue in terms of “I never would have said this to you if I knew it would get around.”

And that’s an interesting ethical matter that has never been made 100% clear. If you’re working in the media — whether it be paid or whether you simply style yourself as a reporter of things on your own — there is a sense that, yeah, you should identify yourself if you’re going to use what you hear. I think this Laura Goldman person fits that description, as she is a reporter of some kind or at least has been in the past.

If it’s just a person who happens to have a personal blog and isn’t on the make, but gets into an interesting conversation in a bar? Eh, maybe a different matter.  But that doesn’t seem to be the matter here.

10:00 AM: At least that’s what a Philly blogger is saying.  Laura Goldman of the Naked Philadelphian blog claims that Sarah Madson, wife of the Phillies’ reliever Ryan Madson, said the following:

Sarah Madson declared, “I hate the fans. It is bad enough that they bother us during the season, but they will not leave us alone in December when we go out to eat. We stayed here during the off season last year, but we will be going to California this year. There must be something particularly bad about Phillies fans because all the players leave in the off season.”

She had particular snappish words for the female fans of her husband. “Can you believe that they have the gall to give my husband their number in front of me?”

Some are questioning the overall integrity of the blogger here, but I have yet to see anyone deny that Ms. Madson made the statement.

I take a lot of crap from Philly fans, but that’s OK because I think it’s kind of fun.  I’m guessing, however, that unless someone clearly and loudly establishes that these quotes were fabricated, Ms. Madson is going to think the experience is way less fun.

Odubel Herrera flips his bat on a fly ball, gets benched for lack of hustle

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Phillies outfielder Odubel Herrera has been a polarizing figure in his young career. He’s talented and at times has shined, inspiring the Phillies to give him a long term contract this past offseason. At other times, however, he’s aggravated the snot out of his manager, his teammates and his team’s fans. Last night, in the Phillies-Astros game, he did the latter and was the subject of mockery of the opposing team to boot.

In the first inning he hit a long fly ball to center. He thought it was going out but . . . it didn’t. When the ball came off of his bat, however, he flipped his bat like he went yard. You know our view about bat flips — who cares? Flip away! — but you flip at your own risk. Just because you’re allowed to flip it whenever you want doesn’t mean you’re not gonna get mocked if you flip prematurely. That’s what Herrera did, and he was mocked for the flip by the Astros from the dugout:

If that was all that happened in the game, life would go on just fine. I mean, it’s just a bat flip. But later in the game he committed a more substantive transgression: he failed to hustle in a hustle situation.

In the sixth inning Herrera struck out swinging on a 1-2 curveball. The catcher didn’t hold on to it, though, and the ball went in the dirt. Herrera didn’t bother to run to first base and Pete Mackanin pulled Herrera from the game in a double switch right after that. Asked if Herrera was benched for not running that ball out, Mackanin said “It had something to do with it . . . I’m going to talk to him tomorrow.”

If you’re a veteran and you have hamstring issues or something you can take a dropped strike three off and no one is gonna say anything. If you’re hitting like Herrera has been hitting of late (i.e. pretty well) and you otherwise have no issues with your manager along these lines, it’s doubtful anyone will hold that sort of play against you either as long as it’s an isolated incident.

Herrera is not in that position, however. He’s raised Mackanin’s ire in the past for ignoring signs and taking what Mackanin believed to be a lackadaisical approach to the game. Whether that’s a fair assessment of Herrera or not — we can’t fully know everything about their interaction from the outside — is sort of beside the point. He has to know by now that Mackanin is going to get after him for that stuff and he has to know that him not being in the game is neither good for the Phillies or for Herrera.

Are these growing pains or a signs of a growing problem? That, it would seem, is up to Odubel Herrera.

Video: Minor leaguer bounces a home run off of an outfielder’s head

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Jose Canseco hit 462 homers, was the 1986 Rookie of the Year, the 1988 MVP and played for 17 years in the big leagues, winning two World Series rings and making the playoffs five times. Yet he’s not remembered for any of that. At least not very often.

No, he’s remembered for his ignominy. For his role in participating in and, subsequently, exposing baseball’s PED-fueled world of the 1990s. For his continued insistence that he was blackballed by Major League Baseball and his continued attempts to play via the independent league route. For his crazy post-playing career antics in which he spent a few years tweeting about aliens, conspiracy theories and non-sequiturs of every stripe.

Mostly, though, people remember Canseco for one random play: the time he helped the Indians’ Carlos Martinez to a home run when a fly ball bounced off of Canseco’s head and over the wall back in 1993:

 

Well, Canseco now has a friend in infamy. That friend: Zach Borenstein of the Reno Aces, the Arizona Diamondbacks’ Triple-A affiliate. Yesterday Borenstein pulled a Canseco on what should’ve been an Alex Verdugo F-9:

Borenstein’s glove may have gotten a piece of that — the announcer seemed to think so anyway — and I have a hard time figuring that his head would give it that much bounce. I mean, look how far he was from the wall! He wasn’t even to the warning track. That’s a serious assist.

Still: gonna rule this a Canseco anyway. It’s too good not to.