Day: April 12, 2011

Josh Hamilton injury

Josh Hamilton out 6-8 weeks with fractured humerus


Update: Hamilton is out six-to-eight weeks with a non-displaced fracture of the humerus bone,’s Jon Paul Morosi reports.


While preliminary tests Tuesday showed no dislocation of Josh Hamilton’s right shoulder, the Rangers were concerned enough to send the 2010 AL MVP for an MRI. According to’s Richard Durrett, Hamilton will be placed on the disabled list with the injury.

Hamilton wore a sling to protect the shoulder after exiting Tuesday’s game against the Tigers in the first inning. He was injured sliding headfirst into home plate.

After the game, Hamilton put some of the blame on third-base coach Dave Anderson for sending him after Anderson noticed that the pitcher wasn’t covering home plate on the foul popup.

“I listened to my third base coach,” Hamilton said. “That’s a little too aggressive. The whole time I was watching the play I was listening. [He said], ‘Nobody’s at home, nobody’s at home.’ I was like, ‘Dude, I don’t want to do this. Something’s going to happen.’ But I listened to my coach. And how do you avoid a tag the best, by going in headfirst and get out of the way and get in there. That’s what I did.”

With Hamilton likely to miss at least a couple of weeks, the Rangers will play David Murphy regularly in left field. The news also bodes well for .160-hitting Julio Borbon, who no longer has as much to worry about as far as playing time in center.

Power Rankings: with great power comes great responsibility

Matt LaPorta, Austin Kearns

See, this is what I’m talking about when I say that Power Rankings are tricky things this early in the season.  I go and do something like put the Indians in the top 10 and all of a sudden we have bedlam:

LOS ANGELES OF ANAHEIM, CA—Since the Indians are a consensus  Top 10 Most Powerful Power Team, as determined by the power rankings at NBC, and ESPN, no member of the active roster can be forced to wear pants at any time in the upcoming week, including during game action. Most players seemed uninterested in exercising their new right but closer Chris Perez said he’d “consider it, depending on the weather and how my cleats look without pants and stuff.”

And it just goes on and on like that.

All we can hope for is that the Tribe keeps losing. Because if they win and if I have to put them in the top three or something there’s no telling what those crazy S.O.B.s will do.

Lastings Milledge clears waivers, remains with White Sox at Triple-A

Lastings Milledge

Designated for assignment by the White Sox last week, Lastings Milledge has cleared waivers and accepted and assignment to Triple-A, according to Mark Gonzales of the Chicago Tribune.

That means he’ll remain in Chicago’s organization, but won’t take up a spot on the 40-man roster and can’t be called up again unless the White Sox add him to the roster first (in which case they’d have to waive him again prior to another trip to Triple-A).

Milledge’s stock has obviously plummeted in recent years, as he’s gone from one-time top prospect to clearing waivers at age age 26, but I’m still somewhat surprised that another team didn’t take a flier on him as a backup outfielder.

He’s a good defender in either corner spot who can fake center field for short stretches at a time, and while his overall offensive game hasn’t developed as hoped Milledge is a career .287 hitter with a .793 OPS versus left-handed pitching. As a fourth outfielder or the right-handed-hitting portion of a platoon, he’s still useful.

That was quick: Blue Jays recall Casey Janssen from Triple-A

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When the Blue Jays sent Casey Janssen to Triple-A last week I wrote that it was an undeserved demotion for a veteran reliever with a strong track record in the majors.

I expected a quick return to Toronto for Janssen, but not this quick: Today the Blue Jays recalled him from Triple-A, as placing Rajai Davis on the disabled list allowed them to bypass the usual between-call-up wait.

Janssen is still in danger of being demoted again because he’s one of the few relievers in the Blue Jays’ bullpen with a minor-league option remaining, but presumably they aren’t going to spend all season jerking around a 29-year-old with a $1.1 million salary and 3.10 ERA in 149 career relief appearances.

Frank McCourt hits back at his old law firm’s lawsuit

Frank McCourt

I wrote this morning about the lawsuit Frank McCourt’s former law firm filed against him, seeking a declaration that they did no wrong. Since that time I’ve had a chance to read the complaint (thanks Dodger Divorce!).  It seems sillier to me now than it did then.

Basically, the firm admits — as it must — that their lawyer was tasked with making a document that gave Frank the Dodgers and Jamie the houses. That he screwed up the exhibits to the document, allowing an executed copy to float around that fails to do what the McCourts wanted, and instead lists the Dodgers as community property. Then, when the lawyer realized his error, rather than have the wrong document destroyed and have his clients execute a new version that clearly and definitively separates the property, he just switched in the Exhibits, resulting in multiple, conflicting copies of the document to exist, thereby allowing Jamie to be willfully naive about it all and claim she really owned the Dodgers too.  Which she did successfully, and the undoing of which will cost Frank McCourt millions. The law firm’s excuse: it was merely a “scrivener’s error,” and that the real bad stuff that has happened to McCourt is all the result of him being a bad baseball owner.

Sorry, not buying it. I mean, sure, Frank McCourt has wrecked the Dodgers all by himself, but if it wasn’t for the law firm’s screwup, he’d at least own it outright and be able to wreck them in peace.  The law firm can and does cite any number of ABA ethical guidelines that say that what their employee did was OK, but the fact is that his screwup cost his client big time.  Today Frank McCourt’s spokesman said as much:

“Bingham McCutchen drafted an agreement the Court found did not comply with applicable California law and was invalid because of the conduct of the Bingham firm’s lawyers. Mr. McCourt is disappointed that the Bingham firm is unwilling to accept responsibility for its actions and is instead now trying to defend conduct that is indefensible.”

And how.

I never thought I’d see the day when I thought Frank McCourt was the sympathetic figure.  Me of all people should never have underestimated a law firm like that.