Frank McCourt hits back at his old law firm’s lawsuit

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I wrote this morning about the lawsuit Frank McCourt’s former law firm filed against him, seeking a declaration that they did no wrong. Since that time I’ve had a chance to read the complaint (thanks Dodger Divorce!).  It seems sillier to me now than it did then.

Basically, the firm admits — as it must — that their lawyer was tasked with making a document that gave Frank the Dodgers and Jamie the houses. That he screwed up the exhibits to the document, allowing an executed copy to float around that fails to do what the McCourts wanted, and instead lists the Dodgers as community property. Then, when the lawyer realized his error, rather than have the wrong document destroyed and have his clients execute a new version that clearly and definitively separates the property, he just switched in the Exhibits, resulting in multiple, conflicting copies of the document to exist, thereby allowing Jamie to be willfully naive about it all and claim she really owned the Dodgers too.  Which she did successfully, and the undoing of which will cost Frank McCourt millions. The law firm’s excuse: it was merely a “scrivener’s error,” and that the real bad stuff that has happened to McCourt is all the result of him being a bad baseball owner.

Sorry, not buying it. I mean, sure, Frank McCourt has wrecked the Dodgers all by himself, but if it wasn’t for the law firm’s screwup, he’d at least own it outright and be able to wreck them in peace.  The law firm can and does cite any number of ABA ethical guidelines that say that what their employee did was OK, but the fact is that his screwup cost his client big time.  Today Frank McCourt’s spokesman said as much:

“Bingham McCutchen drafted an agreement the Court found did not comply with applicable California law and was invalid because of the conduct of the Bingham firm’s lawyers. Mr. McCourt is disappointed that the Bingham firm is unwilling to accept responsibility for its actions and is instead now trying to defend conduct that is indefensible.”

And how.

I never thought I’d see the day when I thought Frank McCourt was the sympathetic figure.  Me of all people should never have underestimated a law firm like that.

Report: Royals sign Neftali Feliz

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Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports that the Royals have signed free agent reliever Neftali Feliz, pending a physical. The Brewers designated Feliz for assignment last week and released him on Monday.

Feliz, 29, opened the season as the Brewers’ closer, but struggled and was eventually taken out of the role in mid-May, giving way to Corey Knebel. In 29 appearances spanning 27 innings with the Brewers, Feliz posted a 6.00 ERA with a 21/15 K/BB ratio.

The Royals have had bullpen issues of their own, so Feliz will try to provide some stability given his track record. It’s not clear yet if the Royals want to let Feliz get his feet wet at Triple-A or throw him right into the bullpen mix.

Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base upon return from DL

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Newsday’s Marc Carig reports that the Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base when he returns from the disabled list. Cabrera has been on the disabled list since June 13 with a sprained left thumb, but he’s expected to be activated on Friday.

Cabrera, 31, last played second base in 2014 with the Nationals. He has played shortstop exclusively as a Met the last two seasons. Jose Reyes would continue to play shortstop if the Mets were to go through with the position change. Cabrera would displace T.J. Rivera, who has been playing second base in place of the injured Neil Walker.

In 196 plate appearances this season, Cabrera is hitting .244/.321/.392 with six home runs and 20 RBI. He has made 11 defensive errors, which is tied for the third-most among shortstops behind Tim Anderson (16) and Dansby Swanson (12).