Details of Clay Buchholz’s contract extension with Red Sox

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Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe has the year-by-year breakdown of Clay Buchholz’s new contract extension with the Red Sox:

Signing bonus: $1 million

2012 – $3.5 million

2013 – $5.5 million

2014 – $7.7 million

2015 – $12 million

2016 – $13 million team option or $245,000 buyout

2017 – $13.5 million team option or $500,000 buyout

Add it all up and he’ll get at least $30.5 million for four years and can earn up to $57.25 million for six years.

I’d never blame a young pitcher for taking $30 million in guaranteed money, especially when he’s just 26 years old and still making close to the MLB minimum, so Buchholz certainly did plenty well for himself. With that said, this strikes me as a very team-friendly contract for the Red Sox.

They bought out all three seasons of arbitration and his first season of free agency for $30.5 million and have reasonable team options with remarkably small buyouts for his second and third seasons of free agency. If he gets hurt they’re out $30.5 million, which is a relatively small sum in the world of long-term extensions. And if he stays healthy and effective they locked Buchholz up through age 32 for $57.25 million, which is probably pretty close to what he’d get on the open market for those three free agent years alone come 2015.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.