Manny Ramirez by the numbers

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Forgetting all of the other stuff for a moment, let’s marvel at just how good of a hitter Manny Ramirez was over the course of 19 major league seasons.

– Ramirez finishes his career with a .312/.411/.585 line.  He ranks 87th all-time in average, 32nd in on-base percentage and ninth in slugging percentage.  His .996 career OPS ranks ninth all-time:

1. Babe Ruth – 1.164
2. Ted Williams – 1.116
3. Lou Gehrig – 1.080
4. Barry Bonds – 1.051
5. Albert Pujols – 1.048
6. Jimmie Foxx – 1.038
7. Hank Greenberg – 1.017
8. Rogers Hornsby – 1.010
9. Ramirez – .996
10. Mark McGwire – .982

– 14th all-time with 555 homers.
– 18th all-time with 1,831 RBI
– 24th all-time with 547 doubles
– 26th all-time with 4,826 total bases
– 56th all-time with 1,544 runs scored
– 82nd all-time with 2,574 hits
– 11th all-time with 216 intentional walks
– 13th all-time with 14.9 AB/HR

– Ramirez is 42nd all-time in times on base, compared to just 131st in outs made.

– Ramirez had four 40-homer seasons, leading the AL in 2004 with 43 homers.

– His 165-RBI campaign in 1999 gives him the highest total anyone has amassed since Jimmie Foxx drove in 175 runs for the Red Sox in 1938.

– Ramirez led the AL in OPS in 1999, 2000 and 2004 and finished second on three other occasions. From 1999-2004, he never finished with an OPS under 1.000.

– He led the AL in OBP in 2002, 2003 and 2006.

– Ramirez hit 21 grand slams, which ranks second in MLB history behind Gehrig’s 23.

– Joined with David Ortiz in finishing with a .300 average, 40 homers and 100 RBI in 2004, making them the first pair of teammates to do so since Ruth and Gehrig in 1931.

– Hit .295/.394/.544 in 111 postseason games, playing for two World Series winners with the Red Sox in 2004 and 2007. In 2004, he was the World Series MVP.

– Ranks first all-time with 29 postseason homers, seven more than Bernie Williams. He’s second to Williams with 78 RBI.

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.