The Dodgers haven’t had a full-time security chief for four months

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Reading Bill Shaikin’s report about the Dodgers undegoing a security overhaul in the aftermath of the Bryan Stow attack last week reveals that the Dodgers have been operating without a permanent head of security for four months:

The Dodgers last December dismissed Ray Maytorena, a former Secret Service agent who had overseen the club’s security operations. Maytorena was one of at least 22 front-office employees to leave the organization over the last two off-seasons. The Dodgers consolidated his responsibilities under Francine Hughes, vice president of stadium operations. According to the team’s media guide, Hughes “joined the Dodgers in September 2009 following nearly 15 years in commercial real estate.”

There is an interim person running security under Hughes: Shahram Ariane, who is a former head of Dodgers security and currently runs security for The Claremont Colleges, which is an association of several small suburban schools with a total enrollment just north of 5000.

In the wake of an incident like this, there are security realities and then there is the p.r. overlay, which may or may not contain realities itself.  We on the outside don’t know what the state of Dodger Stadium security was at the time of this incident. We also know that, even if a good, solid security program was actually in place at the time, a review of that program would be called for due to the severity of this incident. Put differently, neither the incident nor the review means that Dodger Stadium security was necessarily deficient.

But given the public mood since the time of the attack and the anecdotes coming to the fore about Dodger Stadium being a scary place to see a game in recent years, the fact that there has not been a permanent security person in place since December is troubling. And, even if it’s merely a matter of appearances and security was, in fact, reasonable, not having someone in that position is going to become fodder for lawsuits, investigations and other kinds of scrutiny of the Dodgers organization.

Jorge Soler diagnosed with strained oblique, Opening Day in doubt

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Royals outfielder Jorge Soler has been diagnosed with a strained oblique, making it likely that he begins the regular season on the disabled list, Rustin Dodd of The Kansas City Star reports.

The Royals acquired Soler from the Cubs in December in exchange for reliever Wade Davis. Over parts of three seasons with the Cubs, Soler hit .258/.328/.434 with 27 home runs and 98 RBI in 765 plate appearances.

When he’s healthy, Soler is expected to find himself in the Royals’ lineup as a right fielder and occasionally as a designated hitter.

Report: Cardinals, Yadier Molina making “major progress” on contract extension

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Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that the Cardinals and catcher Yadier Molina are making “major progress” on a contract extension. Molina told the team he won’t discuss an extension during the season, hence the rapid progress.

Molina is entering the last guaranteed year of a five-year, $75 million contract signed in March 2012. He and the Cardinals hold a mutual option worth $15 million with a $2 million buyout for the 2018 season. The new extension would presumably cover at least the 2018-19 seasons and likely ’20 as well.

Molina is 34 years old but is still among the most productive catchers in baseball. Last season, he hit .307/.360/.427 with 38 doubles, 58 RBI, and 56 runs scored in 581 plate appearances. Though he has lost a step or two with age, Molina is still well-regarded for his defense. The Cardinals also value his ability to handle the pitching staff.