Great Moments in Competitive Imbalance: Texas High School Baseball Edition

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This is what some Orioles fans want you think playing in the AL East is like:

Late on a school night, in a game already delayed because of lightning, Richardson Lake Highlands High School came to bat in the top of the fifth inning leading Dallas Samuell by around 30 runs. Then they scored another 20 or so. The final score was either 53-0, like the scoreboard read, or 57-0, like the winning coach tallied it up.

That’s the intro to an interesting story about amateur ethics (or “etticks” if you prefer).  There’s a mercy rule about ending games like that, but this one was out of hand even before the mercy rule kicked in. There’s a fail safe “we both agree to give up” rule too, but apparently no one really knows about it.  There’s some interesting talk towards the end of the article about potentially turning the end of games like these into mini-clinics, but I can’t help but think that the guys on the losing side really don’t want to be treated like students to the other side’s teachers.

As a parent of kids just getting started in sports, this stuff interests me.  For now, I think the way they do things in my son’s soccer league is the best: don’t keep score, and make sure everyone at least has a snack to look forward to after the game is over.

Pete Rose dismisses his defamation lawsuit against John Dowd

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Last year Pete Rose field a defamation lawsuit against attorney John Dowd after Dowd gave a radio interview in which he said that Rose had sexual relations with underage girls that amounted to “statutory rape, every time.” Today Rose dismissed the suit.

In a statement issued by Rose’s lawyer and Dowd’s lawyer, the parties say they agreed “based on mutual consideration, to the dismissal with prejudice of Mr. Rose’s lawsuit against Mr. Dowd.” They say they can’t comment further.

Dowd, of course, is the man who conducted the investigation into Rose’s gambling which resulted in the Hit King being placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list back in 1989. The two have sparred through the media sporadically over the years, with Rose disputing Dowd’s findings despite agreeing to his ban back in 1989. Rose has changed his story about his gambling many times, usually when he had an opportunity to either make money off of it, like when he wrote his autobiography, or when he sought, unsuccessfully, to be reinstated to baseball. Dowd has stood by his report ever since it was released.

In the wake of Dowd’s radio comments in 2015, a woman came forward to say that she and Rose had a sexual relationship when she was under the age of 16, seemingly confirming Dowd’s assertion and forming the basis for a strong defense of Rose’s claims (truth is a total defense to a defamation claim). They seem now, however, to have buried the hatchet. Or at least buried the litigation.

That leaves Dowd more free time to defend his latest client, President Trump. And Rose more time to do whatever it is Pete Rose does with his time.