Boston Red Sox v Cleveland Indians

Swagger Alert! Apparently the Red Sox need some of it

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Headline in Rob Bradford’s column about the reeling Red Sox over at WEEI: “Red Sox in search of their swagger (and a win).”  Content:

Everybody understands that the Red Sox have the potential to be what Ortiz mandated all who wear the uniform be back in ’07 — bad blankety-blanks. And every player Tuesday night seemed as steadfast in the belief that their talent was going to ultimately win out as they did prior to playing in from 9,025 (the smallest collection of fans to watch a Red Sox game since 2000).

The problem is that they haven’t found the key to unlock their inner-bad-blankety-blank-ness.

Where I come from, you don’t simply choose to have “swagger” and to become a “bad (blankety-blank)”  in order to accomplish something. Rather, you attain and become such things as a result of your accomplishments.  But maybe I’m just doing it wrong. Maybe I’m just forgetting all of the good examples of teams and players who were described as having “swagger” or being “bad (blankety-blanks)” despite having won nothing. I mean I must be, right? Because if not, it would mean that such concepts are so much ex-post-facto baloney.

Bogaerts hit streak at 23 as Red Sox beat Orioles 7-2

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BALTIMORE (AP) Xander Bogaerts did the damage early, extending his hitting streak to 23 games and driving in two runs.

From there, Boston used the long ball to pull away from the Baltimore Orioles in a matchup between the top two teams in the AL East.

Jackie Bradley put the first-place Red Sox ahead for good with a sixth-inning homer, and David Ortiz and Marco Hernandez connected in the eighth to seal a 7-2 victory Monday.

Knuckleballer Steven Wright (5-4) pitched a four-hitter, striking out seven and walking five in his third straight complete game.

Mookie Betts scored twice, courtesy of Bogaerts, before Bradley connected off Tyler Wilson (2-4) leading off the sixth. Bradley’s 29-game hitting streak, which ended last week, is the only one this season longer than Bogaerts’ career-best run.

“I’m just trying to go up there and get hits, you know? If it happens, it happens,” Bogaerts said. “Just trying to be me, and not trying to be someone who I’m not.”

Ortiz led off the eighth with his 14th home run and Hernandez added a three-run shot to send many in the crowd of 43,926 up the exit ramps. Hernandez’s first major league homer came in his 10th game.

Wright, meanwhile, threw a 122-pitch masterpiece by mixing a fluttering knuckler with a vastly contrasting fastball.

“It was a challenge,” Baltimore’s Mark Trumbo said. “He had great stuff today. It never ended up where it started. You can’t really predict where to swing. You just hope that you get one that maybe doesn’t move quite as much.”

Ryan Flaherty doubled in a run and scored one for the Orioles, who have lost six of eight.

Wilson gave up three runs and eight hits over 6 2-3 innings in losing his third straight start.

Limited to an infield hit over the first four innings, Baltimore temporarily solved Wright’s knuckler in the fifth. Nolan Reimold tripled, Flaherty doubled, Caleb Joseph snapped an 0-for-19 skid with a single and Adam Jones delivered a sacrifice fly to tie the game at 2.

“They’re a very aggressive team. They’re all really good hitters,” Wright said. “In that inning they scored the two runs, I think I kind of got caught up in the same speed.”

The deadlock lasted only until Bradley crushed Wilson’s third pitch of the following inning.

Boston got a first-inning run when Betts scored from second base on Bogaerts’ dribbler down the third-base line. Bogaerts was thrown out, but neither Wilson nor Joseph, the catcher, got back to cover the plate. Replays indicated the ball bounced off Bogaerts’ foot in foul ground, but such plays are not reviewable.

Bogaerts knew the ball should have been called foul, but learned from experience to run it out.

“We had a play back at home, same play. I stood at home, the ball hit me, and they threw to first, out,” he said. “I told the umpire the ball hit me, and he said, `No, you’re out.’ This time I’m running, you know. And it worked out for RBI.”

Bogaerts hit an RBI double in the third following singles by Betts and Dustin Pedroia.

DOUBLE DOWN

Red Sox: Bogaerts’ two doubles increased Boston’s major-league leading total to 133, but Ortiz’s career-high run of six straight games with a double came to an end.

Orioles: Flaherty’s fifth-inning double was his second in 61 at-bats this season and produced his second RBI.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Red Sox: Placed on the concussion list May 20, utility man Brock Holt has ramped up his baseball-related activities. But there is no timetable for his return, manager John Farrell said. … Ortiz returned after sitting out Sunday’s game in Toronto with a sore left foot.

Orioles: RHP Yovani Gallardo (shoulder tendinitis) will begin his rehabilitation assignment on Thursday and with 40-60 pitches in a minor league game. … SS J.J. Hardy (broken foot) will have a CT scan Friday. He hopes to be cleared to begin baseball-related activities. Joseph was taken to the hospital for observation after getting struck in the groin by a foul ball.

UP NEXT

Red Sox: Eduardo Rodriguez (right knee) comes off the disabled list to make his season debut, starting on the mound Tuesday night against the organization that drafted him. Rodriquez went 0-3 in five rehab starts with Triple-A Pawtucket. After the game, Boston sent reliever Heath Hembree to the minors to make room for Rodriguez.

Orioles: Starting for the eighth time this season, Kevin Gausman (0-2, 3.24 ERA) makes another run at his first win.

Harvey rediscovers form, leads Mets over White Sox 1-0

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NEW YORK (AP) Matt Harvey rediscovered his form with seven dominant innings of two-hit ball, Neil Walker homered off Jose Quintana, and the New York Mets beat Chicago 1-0 Monday to send the reeling White Sox to their seventh straight loss.

Harvey (4-7) has been one of baseball’s biggest puzzles, transforming from a premier pitcher to baffled ballplayer. Two weeks ago, he was booed at Citi Field when he lasted just 2 2/3 innings against Washington. This time, fans started to stand and cheer when he got two strikes on Jose Abreu in the fourth, and the crowd gave him a huge ovation when he escaped the seventh-inning jam.

With both teams wearing special Memorial Day uniforms with camouflage lettering and trim, Harvey struck out six and walked two to win for the first time since May 8. His fastball velocity was up markedly, and he threw 61 of 87 pitches for strikes.

Harvey, pitching to backup catcher Rene Rivera for the first time this season, retired his first 13 batters before J.B. Shuck lined a single to left, and Shuck got doubled up when first baseman Wilmer Flores made a diving catch on Brett Lawrie‘s liner.

Harvey didn’t go to a three-ball count until facing Alex Avila in the sixth and was at 70 pitches through six innings, facing the minimum 18 hitters. Harvey pitched into the seventh for the first time this year.

Adam Eaton walked on a 3-2 pitch leading off the seventh and Abreu grounded a single to left on the next pitch. After a mound visit from pitching coach Dan Warthen, Melky Cabrera sacrificed, Todd Frazier fouled out to first and Shuck grounded out, causing Harvey to make a small first pump as he walked off the mound.

Harvey was coming off three straight losses in which he allowed 19 runs and 27 hits, and he struck out a career-low one last week at Washington. He worked on adjusting his mechanics when he threw to hitters before Friday’s game, and he seemed to reach back more toward second in his windup before starting his arm toward the plate.

In his only previous start against the White Sox, Harvey retired his first 20 batters before Alex Rios beat out an infield single on May 7, 2013, and that was the only runner he allowed over nine innings during a game the Mets won in the 10th.

Addison Reed struck out two in a perfect eighth. After wasting a four-run lead in the Mets’ win over Los Angeles on Friday and giving up a pair of ninth-inning runs in Sunday’s loss to the Dodgers, Jeurys Familia got three straight outs to remain perfect in 17 save chances. He has converted 33 consecutive save opportunities dating to last season.

Quintana (5-5) was almost as good but has lost four straight starts for the first time in his big league career. He allowed four singles before Walker led off the Mets’ seventh with his 12th homer, a drive over the 370-foot sign in left.

Chicago is on its longest slid since dropping eight straight from last June 12-19. The White Sox have lost 15 of 19 following a 23-10 start and were coming off a three-game series at Kansas City in which they wasted late leads each day.

NOT A HIT

Brett Lawrie was hit on a hand on the ninth pitch of his at-bat against Harvey in the second, but first base umpire Sam Holbrook ruled he swung

FIRSTS

Mets rookie Ty Kelly singled up the middle in the fifth for his first major league hit.

COMING UP NEXT

Acquired from San Diego last weekend for $1, first baseman James Loney reported to the Mets and will be active for Tuesday night’s game.

TRAINER’S ROOM

White Sox: OF Austin Jackson was not available because of turf toe in his left foot. White Sox manager Robin Ventura hopes he can avoid the DL.

Mets: Mets manager Terry Collins is worried 3B David Wright‘s neck injury might lead to a stint on the DL.

UP NEXT

LHP Steven Matz (7-1), who has won seven straight starts, is to take the mound Tuesday night or New York against Mat Latos (6-1). Because of a short outing caused by his ejection Saturday, Noah Syndergaard will be available in the bullpen for the Mets.

Collins worried David Wright might go on disabled list

Washington Nationals v New York Mets
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NEW YORK — Mets manager Terry Collins is worried David Wright may wind up on the disabled list because of a neck injury.

New York’s captain and third baseman was out of the starting lineup for the third straight day Monday because of his neck. He was given anti-inflammatory medicine over the weekend.

Now 33, Wright was on the disabled list from April 15 to Aug. 24 last year when he strained his right hamstring and then developed spinal stenosis. He has a lengthy physical therapy routine he must go through before each game.

“With the condition he’s been playing in and the condition he’s in right now, yeah, I’m concerned about it,” Collins said Monday. “Is it going to happen? I can’t tell you. I don’t know. I’m not a doctor. I know this guy plays with a lot of discomfort. He always has. And when he can’t play, he’s hurt.”

Wright homered in three straight games last week before getting hurt. He is batting .226 with seven homers, 14 RBIs and 55 strikeouts in 137 at-bats.

Settling the Scores: Memorial Day edition

ARLINGTON, VA - MAY 21:  American flags are shown after being placed by members of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment at the graves of U.S. soldiers buried at Arlington National Cemetery, in preparation for Memorial Day May 21, 2015 in Arlington, Virginia. "Flags-In" has become an annual ceremony since the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) was designated to be an Army's official ceremonial unit in 1948  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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Memorial Day commemorates the men and women who died in military service. At some point in the past couple of decades, however, it has become an all-purpose flag-waving, patriotism-declaring, civilians-in-camouflage holiday. It’s understandable why this is the case. We, as a country, haven’t always done mourning well. I think it’s part of our national cultural DNA that we don’t and it’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it does make days like this difficult.

I feel like the flag-waving and troop-supporting stuff is some sort of subconscious reaction to death. It’s our way of instantly trying to justify those deaths or to explain how they were not in vain, much the same way we might tell someone upon the death of a loved one that they’re in a better place or that they had a full life. Feeling the pain of loss is hard. We want to soften it in any way we can and make our pain serve a larger, better purpose. And so we get today, when Major League Baseball puts its players in camouflage caps and in jerseys with camouflage logos. They’ll sell them too, with proceeds going to good and noble veterans charities. The intent is noble and the ultimate effect of it all is beneficial. But it’s also a little beside the point. Maybe not beside the point as much as mattress sales or big celebratory barbecues which have come to characterize Memorial Day for so many, but still not exactly the purpose of the holiday.

I don’t condemn it. As I wrote last year, the men and women who actually fought and died in wars were hoping that they were, ultimately, making a better and happier world for those they left behind. And they no doubt hoped, among everything else they hoped, that others didn’t have to face what they were facing. They wanted our lives to be happy and our country to be safe and part of a happy and safe country involves 300 million people doing whatever it is they damn please, even if it’s just having barbecues and wearing camo at the ballpark.

I won’t say have a happy Memorial Day because that seems odd. Have any kind of Memorial Day you want, really, even if it includes barbecuing, drinking beer and wearing a cam ballcap. But as you do, please make sure you take some time to think about those who died in military service. And remember that they didn’t get to have as many days like the one you’re having as they were meant to have. And make at least some effort to offset your happy, patriotic or silly pursuits with some mourning and reflectiveness. It’s OK for that to stand on its own.

The scores:

Red Sox 5, Blue Jays 3
Orioles 6, Indians 4
Yankees 2, Rays 1
Nationals 10, Cardinals 2
Brewers 5, Reds 4
Royals 5, White Sox 4
Cubs 7, Phillies 2
Rangers 6, Pirates 2
Astros 8, Angels 6
Athletics 4, Tigers 2
Twins 5, Mariners 4
Giants 8, Rockies 3
Diamondbacks 6, Padres 3
Marlins 7, Braves 3
Dodgers 4, Mets 2