Rafael Soriano’s media snub is a legitimate problem

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UPDATE: Our long national nightmare is over: Soriano has apologized.

9:34 AM: There is a lot of back and forth on the Internets this morning about Rafael Soriano’s decision to dress quickly and leave the clubhouse before the reporters could get to him after last night’s debacle. Mark Feinsand of the Daily News, Joel Sherman of the Post and many others have gone after Soriano for the snub.  Brien Jackson over at IIATMS and most of the commenters over at BTF think this is much ado about nothing. The media making itself the story, the tempest-in-a-teapot nature of the New York press or what have you.

Nine times out of ten I side with the guys at IIATMS and my friends at BTF because, you know, they’re almost always right. But this time I have to differ. I think Soriano’s bail-job is a legitimate issue, not a media-created one.

There was a situation with the Mets a few years ago in which Billy Wagner spoke out about how certain players wouldn’t face the media after a bad game and how it left others to do the talking. He wasn’t mad because the snub of the media created a silly controversy. He was legitimately mad at having the snub for its own sake.

Yes, it’s the Mets and there is always rancor there, but players legitimately dislike it when the people who the reporters really will want to talk to — especially goats of the game — pull a disappearing act. Track down some of the game stories from last night’s Yankees-Twins game. There were several “I guess” or “you’ll have to ask him” kinds of things said when Yankees players talked about Soriano and the eighth inning disaster. I could be imagining it, but I sense some low-level aggravation there. Aggravation that players don’t need when they’re already upset about the loss and their own failures in the game.

The Yankees have made a point to give their players media training. A big part of this is facing the music after a bad game. When Soriano doesn’t do that he’s both ticking off his teammates and not going along with the team’s program. That’s a problem.  Maybe not as big a problem as it will get blown up into today, but it’s real.

Rockies place Carlos Gonzalez and Tyler Anderson on the disabled list

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The Rockies announced on Monday that outfielder Carlos Gonzalez and pitcher Tyler Anderson were placed on the 10-day disabled list. The club activated reliever Chad Qualls from the disabled list and recalled reliever Jairo Diaz from Triple-A Albuquerque.

Gonzalez, 31, is dealing with a strained right shoulder. He’s in the midst of his worst season, batting .221/.300/.348 with six home runs and 20 RBI in 277 plate appearances. Gonzalez is a free agent after the season and has been commonly brought up in trade discussions, but his latest injury and underwhelming season will make it difficult for the Rockies to get anything meaningful in return this summer.

Anderson, 27, has inflammation in his left knee. He dealt with a knee problem earlier this season, so the injury seems to have been reaggravated. The lefty has an ugly 6.11 ERA with a 63/23 K/BB ratio in 63 1/3 innings this season.

Qualls, 38, went on the disabled list earlier this month with back spasms. He had previously been dealing with forearm inflammation, so it’s been a rough year for the veteran. He is carrying a 4.60 ERA with a 9/5 K/BB ratio in 15 2/3 innings.

Diaz, 26, hasn’t appeared in the majors since 2015. He has appeared in only eight games at Triple-A as he opened the season on the disabled list after undergoing Tommy John surgery last year. So far, Diaz has allowed three earned runs on seven hits and two walks with nine strikeouts in 7 2/3 innings.

Zach Putnam underwent Tommy John surgery

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White Sox reliever Zach Putnam underwent Tommy John surgery last week, CSN Chicago’s Dan Hayes reports.

Putnam, 29, had been on the disabled list since late April with a right elbow injury. He was cleared to begin throwing last month but was shut down after experiencing more elbow discomfort earlier this month. Putnam had surgery on his right elbow last August to remove a bone fragment as well, so it was an issue that had been nagging him for more than a year.

Putnam appeared in only seven games this season, giving up one run on two hits and a walk with nine strikeouts in 8 2/3 innings. The White Sox won’t be able to count on him until the middle of next season at the earliest.