Los Angeles, San Francisco city leaders condemn ballpark violence

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There was a time from the late 60s through to about the mid-80s when going to the ballpark was an unpleasant and, at times, dangerous experience. Alcohol flowed too freely, security was lax and ticket prices were cheap enough to where people who weren’t particularly invested in baseball games for baseball games’ sake didn’t think twice about showing up, more interested in partying or raising hell than in following the action.  Sadly, Thursday night’s horrifying beating of a man outside of Dodger Stadium reminded us of that time.

As of this morning the victim of the attack, Bryan Stow, a paramedic from Santa Cruz, remains in a medically-induced coma and his friends say that there has been no change in his condition. Meanwhile, in the wake of the attack, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, San Francisco Mayor Edwin M. Lee and police chiefs from both cities issued a statement of condemnation and urged civility among fans:

“This attack is unconscionable behavior that will not be tolerated in either of our ballparks or in either of our cities. Once apprehended, the attackers will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Public safety is the top priority for all of us, and even one act of random violence is unacceptable.

“Baseball is a family sport that has unified our country after times of crisis and tragedy. This senseless act of violence has no place in our society and certainly not in our national pastime.

“The Giant/Dodger rivalry is one of the most storied in all of sports, dating back to when the teams played across town in New York City before their moves to California. This is a great rivalry between teams competing on the field of play. That’s where it must stay.

“We call on our respective citizens to stand together in honor of that rivalry as you have done throughout the years. Root hard for your teams, and do so with civility and common decency.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the victim, Bryan Stow, and his family. The best thing that we as a community of baseball fans can do to support Bryan and his family is to rise above this outrageous act and exercise good sportsmanship and mutual respect for each other.”

Perhaps more effective than the call for civility, however, is the fact that L.A. has issued a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the attackers. Here’s hoping that it is righteously claimed, and soon.

Madison Bumgarner likely sidelined through the All-Star break

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It’s been just over a week since Giants’ left-hander Madison Bumgarner got a serious scare after a nasty dirt bike accident. He escaped with bruised ribs and a Grade 2 strain of his left shoulder AC joint, but there was some speculation that the injuries would cause a significant, if not permanent, setback in the southpaw’s career. Thankfully, things aren’t looking quite so bleak today. Not only will Bumgarner not require surgery, but he could return as soon as the week following the All-Star break, the Giants said Friday.

Of course, that timeline is wholly dependent on how smoothly the recovery process goes, so nothing is set in stone yet. NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic estimates 2-3 months of rest and rehab, including “two months before he can get back on the mound and then another three to four weeks of throwing and rehab starts before he’s big league-ready.” It’s a long and laborious schedule, but still looks much better than any surgical alternative.

Prior to the accident, Bumgarner was working on a solid start to the 2017 season. He maintained a 3.00 ERA, 1.3 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 through 27 innings with the club, though his average 1.75 runs of support per start fed into an 0-3 record.

Video: Manny Machado hits a 470-foot home run

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You’ve seen Carlos Gomez’s 461-foot home run. You’ve seen Joey Gallo’s 462-foot blast. You’ve seen Corey Seager’s 462-footer, too. During Friday’s series opener against the Yankees, Manny Machado delivered the tie-breaker we were all hoping for, launching a 470-foot moonshot over the center field wall to pad the Orioles’ 5-0 lead in the fifth:

It was Machado’s fourth homer of the season, and quite a doozy, according to Statcast. MLB.com’s Brittany Ghiroli says that it’s currently the longest home run recorded at Yankee Stadium, dating back through Statcast’s inception in 2015.

Through eight innings, the Yankees and Orioles combined for five home runs and two grand slams, though none reached quite as far as Machado’s record-setting blast. Aaron Judge went deep twice, hitting the 417-foot mark in the fifth inning and the 435-mark in the sixth, while Mark Trumbo executed a 459-foot grand slam in the sixth inning, followed by a 420-foot slam from Jacoby Ellsbury in the seventh. The Orioles currently lead the Yankees 11-8 in the ninth inning.