Bonds case update: the prosecution will rest today

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Today will be the last day of the prosecution’s case-in-chief in the Barry Bonds trial, as they finish with Don Catlin, the anti-doping expert, and have the grand jury testimony read to the jury. The defense will then start their case, either today or tomorrow, but it will be a shorter deal than the prosecution’s. Indeed, it could be over this week.

Observers are pretty down on the prosecution after one of their own witnesses, Dr. Arthur Ting, blew a hole in the credibility of one of their other witnesses, Steven Hoskins on Thursday.  Calling Ting was just a baffling move by the prosecution. If they knew what he was going to say, why call him?  If they didn’t know, why risk it and, really, how prepared were they?  Given that, in the absence of Greg Anderson,  Hoskins is the witness who comes the closest to nailing Bonds for knowingly using steroids, having him impeached like that is simply brutal.

The consensus now is that, if the prosecution is going to get a conviction, it will be on count two of the indictment: the “did you ever have someone inject you” count. This, I think, Hoskins’ sister nailed pretty well, and did so with credibility according to those who watched her in court.  For those who never obsessed on this bit, the testimony in question involved a particularly hostile exchange between Bonds and the prosecutor in which, after Bonds was asked if Greg Anderson ever injected him with anything, Bonds lashed out with a rambling non-sequitur. His testimony:

“I’ve only had one doctor touch me. And that’s my only personal doctor. Greg, like I said, we don’t get into each other’s personal lives. We’re friends, but I don’t – we don’t sit around and talk baseball because he knows I don’t want – don’t come to my house talking baseball. If you want to come to my house and talk about fishing, some other stuff, we’ll be good friends. You come around talking about baseball, you go on. I don’t talk about his business. You know what I mean?”

Which made absolutely no sense. He eventually said no, Anderson never injected him.  Ego demands that, at this point, I reproduce my analysis of this charge from March 2008:

The famous “don’t come to my house talking baseball” digression. Bonds offers it – and a few paragraphs more about not knowing what’s in his wife’s purse and “getting into other people’s business” – in response to a simple question: “Did Greg ever give you anything that required a syringe to inject yourself with.” It’s a total non-sequitur on Bonds’ part, and seems distinctly like someone vamping while trying to figure out how to answer a question he doesn’t want to answer.

The question is why he’s doing this? To that point he’s done a pretty convincing job of playing dumb. Even if Bonds himself knows that he’s being injected with illegal North Korean nuclear secrets, he’s probably Scot free if he says “yes,” and when asked what he was injected with says “I don’t know.” Instead he draws glowing neon attention to himself with his non-answer, and it prompts follow up questions about injections, many of which can be found in the indictment.

What is Bonds doing? To me the answer appears obvious: he’s trying to protect Greg Anderson. No other explanation makes sense. Simply saying he was injected with something does nothing to put him in any worse a light than the stuff he’s already says. The issue of syringes are ultimately inconsequential, but as I note above, the thing he’s probably most likely to be convicted of lying about at trial. How utterly pathetic.

Know what I think? I think this was the one time when the prosecution asked Bonds a simple question that required a yes or no answer and Bonds, unable to truthfully say no, kind of freaked out and ultimately lied.  If they did this with the steroids-related questions he may have pleaded out years ago or he may be convicted now.  But he was allowed to weasel and, ultimately, was allowed to testify without explicitly lying on those points.  With the syringe question, however, he’s fairly dead to rights.

The interesting question is going to be what we make of it all if Bonds is convicted on a single count of lying about something that doesn’t itself involve steroids.  Some people have sought to make Bonds and Roger Clemens special cases among PED users because they allegedly lied rather than come clean (the Andy Pettitte corollary, we can call it). If Bonds is acquitted of lying about his use under oath, these people will need a new argument to stay intellectually inconsistent it seems. Or, I suppose, they could cite his lie under oath about a syringe as the same thing. Or they could just join in with the “Bonds is a bad seed crowd” and forget their prior distinction.

It does seem to me, however, that the legal and public case against Barry Bonds was premised on more than a mere lie about whether a syringe was ever used on his body by someone other than his doctor. If that’s all that comes out of this, I don’t see how one can conclude that this was a success by any measure.

Report: Orioles interested in Lance Lynn

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The Orioles singlehandedly kept the rumor mill churning this weekend. MLB Network’s Jon Morosi reports that the club is interested in making a play for free agent right-hander Lance Lynn, adding him to a list of potential candidates that also includes free agent righty Alex Cobb. The two are expected to command similar contracts in free agency, but Morosi notes that the Orioles may prefer Cobb based on his familiarity with the AL East.

Lynn, 30, is two years removed from Tommy John surgery on his right elbow. Despite missing the 2016 season, he bounced back with a respectable 11-8 record in 33 starts and complemented his efforts with a 3.43 ERA, 3.8 BB/9 and 7.4 SO/9 over 186 1/3 innings for the 2017 Cardinals. He lost several days with a blister on his pitching hand in early September, but managed to avoid any major injuries and can reasonably be expected to shoulder another heavy workload in 2018.

Lynn may not be the Orioles’ first choice to beef up their starting rotation, but there’s no doubt that he’ll be in high demand as one of very few viable starters on the market this winter. The veteran righty rejected his one-year, $17.4 million qualifying offer from the Cardinals on Thursday and will likely be seeking a multi-year contract, one that Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch estimates around five years and $100+ million. If the Orioles are willing to bite that bullet, they’ll still need to compensate the Cardinals with their third pick in next year’s draft.