Barry Bonds Perjury Trial Begins in San Francisco

Bonds case update: the prosecution will rest today

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Today will be the last day of the prosecution’s case-in-chief in the Barry Bonds trial, as they finish with Don Catlin, the anti-doping expert, and have the grand jury testimony read to the jury. The defense will then start their case, either today or tomorrow, but it will be a shorter deal than the prosecution’s. Indeed, it could be over this week.

Observers are pretty down on the prosecution after one of their own witnesses, Dr. Arthur Ting, blew a hole in the credibility of one of their other witnesses, Steven Hoskins on Thursday.  Calling Ting was just a baffling move by the prosecution. If they knew what he was going to say, why call him?  If they didn’t know, why risk it and, really, how prepared were they?  Given that, in the absence of Greg Anderson,  Hoskins is the witness who comes the closest to nailing Bonds for knowingly using steroids, having him impeached like that is simply brutal.

The consensus now is that, if the prosecution is going to get a conviction, it will be on count two of the indictment: the “did you ever have someone inject you” count. This, I think, Hoskins’ sister nailed pretty well, and did so with credibility according to those who watched her in court.  For those who never obsessed on this bit, the testimony in question involved a particularly hostile exchange between Bonds and the prosecutor in which, after Bonds was asked if Greg Anderson ever injected him with anything, Bonds lashed out with a rambling non-sequitur. His testimony:

“I’ve only had one doctor touch me. And that’s my only personal doctor. Greg, like I said, we don’t get into each other’s personal lives. We’re friends, but I don’t – we don’t sit around and talk baseball because he knows I don’t want – don’t come to my house talking baseball. If you want to come to my house and talk about fishing, some other stuff, we’ll be good friends. You come around talking about baseball, you go on. I don’t talk about his business. You know what I mean?”

Which made absolutely no sense. He eventually said no, Anderson never injected him.  Ego demands that, at this point, I reproduce my analysis of this charge from March 2008:

The famous “don’t come to my house talking baseball” digression. Bonds offers it – and a few paragraphs more about not knowing what’s in his wife’s purse and “getting into other people’s business” – in response to a simple question: “Did Greg ever give you anything that required a syringe to inject yourself with.” It’s a total non-sequitur on Bonds’ part, and seems distinctly like someone vamping while trying to figure out how to answer a question he doesn’t want to answer.

The question is why he’s doing this? To that point he’s done a pretty convincing job of playing dumb. Even if Bonds himself knows that he’s being injected with illegal North Korean nuclear secrets, he’s probably Scot free if he says “yes,” and when asked what he was injected with says “I don’t know.” Instead he draws glowing neon attention to himself with his non-answer, and it prompts follow up questions about injections, many of which can be found in the indictment.

What is Bonds doing? To me the answer appears obvious: he’s trying to protect Greg Anderson. No other explanation makes sense. Simply saying he was injected with something does nothing to put him in any worse a light than the stuff he’s already says. The issue of syringes are ultimately inconsequential, but as I note above, the thing he’s probably most likely to be convicted of lying about at trial. How utterly pathetic.

Know what I think? I think this was the one time when the prosecution asked Bonds a simple question that required a yes or no answer and Bonds, unable to truthfully say no, kind of freaked out and ultimately lied.  If they did this with the steroids-related questions he may have pleaded out years ago or he may be convicted now.  But he was allowed to weasel and, ultimately, was allowed to testify without explicitly lying on those points.  With the syringe question, however, he’s fairly dead to rights.

The interesting question is going to be what we make of it all if Bonds is convicted on a single count of lying about something that doesn’t itself involve steroids.  Some people have sought to make Bonds and Roger Clemens special cases among PED users because they allegedly lied rather than come clean (the Andy Pettitte corollary, we can call it). If Bonds is acquitted of lying about his use under oath, these people will need a new argument to stay intellectually inconsistent it seems. Or, I suppose, they could cite his lie under oath about a syringe as the same thing. Or they could just join in with the “Bonds is a bad seed crowd” and forget their prior distinction.

It does seem to me, however, that the legal and public case against Barry Bonds was premised on more than a mere lie about whether a syringe was ever used on his body by someone other than his doctor. If that’s all that comes out of this, I don’t see how one can conclude that this was a success by any measure.

Trevor May joins eSports team Luminosity

CLEVELAND, OH - AUGUST 04: Trevor May #65 of the Minnesota Twins pitches against the Cleveland Indians in the sixth inning at Progressive Field on August 4, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. The Indians defeated the Twins 9-2.  (Photo by David Maxwell/Getty Images)
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When he’s not throwing baseballs, Twins pitcher Trevor May is an active gamer. He streams on Twitch, a very popular video game streaming site, fairly regularly and now he’s officially on an eSports team. Luminosity Gaming announced the organization added May last Friday. It appears he’ll be streaming and commentating on Overwatch, a multiplayer first-person shooter made by Blizzard Entertainment.

May is the only current athlete to be an active member of an eSports team. Former NBA player Rick Fox owns Echo Fox, an eSports team that sports players in games including League of Legends, Super Smash Bros. Melee, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, Street Fighter V, Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, and Mortal Kombat X. Jazz forward Gordon Hayward is also a known advocate of eSports.

The NBA in particular has been very active on the eSports front. Kings co-owners Andy Miller and Mark Mastrov launched NRG eSports in November 2015. Shortly thereafter, Grizzlies co-owner Stephen Kaplan invested in the Immortals eSports team. Almost a year later, the 76ers acquired controlling stakes in Team Dignitas and Team Apex. The same month, the Wizards’ and Warriors’ owners launched a group called Axiomatic, which purchased a controlling stake in Team Liquid, a long-time Starcraft: Brood War website which has since branched out into other games. And also in September 2016, Celtics forward Jonas Jerebko bought team Renegades, moving them to a group house in Detroit. In December 2016, the Bucks submitted a deal to Riot Games in order to purchase Cloud9’s Challenger league spot for $2.5 million. The Rockets that month hired someone specifically for eSports development, focusing on strategy and investment. Last month, the Heat acquired a controlling stake in team Misfits.

Once an afterthought, eSports has grown considerably in recent years and now it should be considered a competitor to traditional sports. League of Legends, in particular, is quite popular, reaching nearly 15 million concurrent viewers at its peak in the most recent League of Legends World Championship. That championship featured a prize purse of $6.7 million with $2 million of it being split among winner SK Telecom T1’s members.

Orioles re-sign Michael Bourn to a minor league deal

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 04:  Michael Bourn #1 of the Baltimore Orioles hits a single in the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays during the American League Wild Card game at Rogers Centre on October 4, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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The Orioles have re-signed outfielder Michael Bourn to a minor league contract with an invitation to major league camp, MASN’s Roch Kubatko reports.

Bourn, 34, joined the Orioles last year in a trade from the Diamondbacks on August 31. Though he compiled a meager .669 OPS with the Diamondbacks, Bourn hit a solid .283/.358/.435 in 55 plate appearances with the O’s through the end of the season.

Bourn, a non-roster invitee to camp, will try to play his way onto the Orioles’ 25-man roster. If he does make the roster, Bourn will receive a $2 million salary, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports points out.