San Francisco Giants v Los Angeles Dodgers

And That Happened: Opening Day’s scores and highlights

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For those of you new to in-season HardballTalk, know this: each weekday morning — and maybe some weekend mornings; I’m thinkin’ about it — I recap the previous day and/or night’s action in a little feature called “And That Happened.”  This is ATH’s fourth year, as I began it over at my old haunt, ShysterBall, where people seemed to like it well enough. If you care, it was named in honor of this video.

I’m told that was recording artist John Mayer, giving some impromptu play-by-play of  the A’s-Red Sox game which opened the 2008 season in Japan, but I’m not a big John Mayer fan so I don’t mind ripping off his bit.

The point, though, is like Mr. Mayer’s commentary, ATH is not meant to provide comprehensive or even necessarily lucid breakdowns of the previous night’s action. Oh, that happens sometimes, but mostly I’m just riffing here. Providing a little flavor of what went down in the game. Maybe an observation or an opinion or something kinda neat from the box score. Maybe an obscure movie line or two which, as long as Aubrey or David Huff remain in the majors, will likely include a few too many Groucho Marx bits.  If you want actual information, click the linked box score before every entry.  Any information I provide is, I assure you, completely by accident.

With that out of the way, let us begin our long journey through the major league season:

Dodgers 2, Giants 1: Buster Posey may be the great test case for whether people only accuse minority ballplayers of lackadaisical, addle-minded play. The run which broke the 0-0 tie was the result of Posey’s poor decision and poor throw trying to pick Matt Kemp off third. Yet, when it happened, the ESPN crew actually blamed the bad play on Pablo Sandoval, saying that he asked for the throw and didn’t do a great job trying to catch it. Maybe he did ask for it, but Posey is the catcher and he’s in charge out there. He should have thought better of it. And sorry, there was no way Sandoval could have gotten to that throw.  Then, in the ninth, Posey hit a little roller to first base that James Loney at first misplayed but then recovered and shoveled to Jonathan Broxton for the out. The ESPN crew lauded Loney for the play — which they should have, because it was a good recovery — but they made no mention of the fact that Posey was shuffling down the line with all the urgency of a condemned prisoner walking the green mile.

The booth walked back their comments regarding the pickoff throw after the commercial break, but both there and in the ninth the impulse to absolve Posey of his baseball sins seemed irresistible. All I could think was how different the reaction may have been had it been B.J. Upton or Hanley Ramirez making those decisions and not running out that roller.

Reds 7, Brewers 6: I would like it to be known that, in my little preview of yesterday’s action, I called Edinson Volquez out as being shaky.  To whom do I report to receive my laurels?  Fine, but that’s a laurel you owe me. Anyway, the Ramon Hernandez walkoff homer saved Volquez’s bacon. Too bad that so many Reds fans had already left the park and thus didn’t see it.  Cincy was a baseball town once. People here in Ohio swear to me that this is true.

Padres 5, Cardinals 3: Pujols goes 0 for 5 and grounds into three double plays. It’s tempting to say something more about that, but given that this brings the score to 1,404,492 times that Pujols did something good to, like, 8 times he did something bad over the past 11 years, I think he’s entitled to a pass here. If Ryan Franklin doesn’t give up a homer with two out in the ninth it doesn’t matter. If Ryan Theriot doesn’t make that error in the 11th, it probably doesn’t matter.  And while we’re on the subject, I expected letting Brendan Ryan go would cost the Cards on defense at some point, but who’d a thunk it would happen on Day One?

Angels 4, Royals 2: Jeff Francoeur had a homer and Melky Cabrera reached base four times.  When those guys are providing your offensive heroics you know you’re in trouble. Oh, and Francoeur came to bat with the bases loaded in the bottom of the eighth. He struck out swinging on a pitch that was above his neck, so it’s good to see him in midseason form.

Braves 2, Nationals 0: All Jason Heyward does is hit home runs in his first Opening Day day at-bat. Year-after-year! And Mac Thomason had a sharp observation over at Braves Journal:

Last year, Bobby often let Lowe work an inning too long, or a batter too long. Fredi didn’t do that this time. When Lowe’s 105th pitch walked Zimmerman with two out in the sixth, Fredi got the hook and brought in O’Flaherty, who allowed a flare single to LaRoche then got out of it.

And how. It’s almost certain that Bobby Cox leaves Lowe in there. Nice to see Fredi bring out the hook.  All of the reasons Fredi Gonzalez is like Bobby Cox are why he got the job. Because following a legend is so tough, however, and because the new guy doesn’t get the same kind of free pass the legend got for the same behavior, it will be the ways in which he differs from Cox and does things better than Cox did which will help him keep the job.

Yankees 6, Tigers 3: Curtis Granderson, like Dante in “Clerks,” wasn’t even supposed to be there yesterday thanks to a wonky oblique muscle.  But he made it, and he had a much better day than Dante did too, what with the go-ahead homer and the nice defense in center. At least I’m assuming he had a better day than Dante. I have no idea how Granderson’s conversations with his girlfriend went after the game. Beyond that, the Yankees script was followed nicely: a strong start from Sabathia and then some shut-down bullpen work from Chamberlain, Soriano and Rivera.  We’ll see that at least 37 times this year. 37!

Report: Teams reluctant to gamble on Cliff Lee

Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Cliff Lee throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park Thursday, July 31, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
AP Photo/Alex Brandon
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In Saturday’s column for the Boston Globe, Nick Cafardo suggests that free agent Cliff Lee is seeking a guaranteed major league deal between $6 and $8 million plus incentives. That is turning some otherwise interested teams away, as the lefty is still recovering from a torn flexor tendon in his left elbow. Lee hasn’t pitched since July 31, 2014.

Last month, Lee’s agent Darek Braunecker said the pitcher would need “a perfect fit” to pitch in 2016. He also noted that Lee has begun a full offseason throwing program.

In his most recent season, Lee compiled a 3.65 ERA with 72 strikeouts and 12 walks in 81 1/3 innings for the Phillies. The Phillies had signed him to a five-year, $120 million contract in December 2010 but declined a club option for the 2016 season, instead buying him out for $12.5 million.

Orioles reconsidering signing Yovani Gallardo

Yovani Gallardo
AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez
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In an article for MASN on Friday, Steve Melewski noted that the Orioles were reluctant to forfeit their first round draft pick (14th overall) in order to sign free agent starter Yovani Gallardo. The club is now reconsidering its stance and rechecking the right-handers medicals, MASN’s Roch Kubatko reports.

Gallardo, who turns 30 on February 27, posted a 3.42 ERA with 121 strikeouts and 68 walks over 184 1/3 innings for the Rangers last season. The Rangers had acquired him in a trade with the Brewers, sending Luis Sardinas, Corey Knebel, and minor leaguer Marcos Diplan to Milwaukee.

Gallardo has posted an ERA below 4.00 in six of his last seven seasons. He remains unsigned into February, however, because his strikeout rate has rapidly decreased with each year since 2012. Per FanGraphs, that rate was 23.7 percent in 2012, then went to 18.6 percent, 17.9 percent, and 15.3 percent progressively. Some of that may have to do with diminishing fastball velocity, as Gallardo’s 90.4 MPH average marked a career low among his eight full seasons with at least 100 innings pitched.

The Orioles lost starter Wei-Yin Chen, who signed with the Marlins, and the back end of their rotation is highly speculative with Kevin Gausman, Mike Wright, Odrisamer Despaigne, and Tyler Wilson. Adding a veteran like Gallardo, even if he is apparently declining, may be stabilizing.

Freddy Garcia is calling it a career

Screenshot 2016-02-07 at 10.16.43 AM
Elsa/Getty Images North America
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MLB.com’s Jesse Sanchez passes along word from the Dominican Republic that right-hander Freddy Garcia will hang up his cleats for good after Sunday’s Caribbean Series championship game.

Garcia will start that game for the Tigres de Aragua out of Venezuela. He’s taking on Mexico’s Venados de Mazatlan.

“Venezuelan fans are expecting something good from Freddy and so is everybody,” said Tigres de Aragua manager Eddie Perez, who also serves as the bullpen coach for the Atlanta Braves. “Knowing that it’s his last game is going to make it very special. We all hope he pitches a really good game so he can retire in a good way and bring the title for Venezuela. Everybody who is rooting for Venezuela expects him to do well.”

Garcia’s last major league game was in the 2013 postseason. The 39-year-0ld will finish with a 4.15 ERA, 1.30 WHIP, and 6.4 K/9 in 2,264 career regular-season innings. He had a 3.26 ERA in 11 playoff starts, winning a World Series title with the White Sox in 2005.

Video: 2016 will be a season to remember

Carlos+Correa+Houston+Astros+v+Arizona+Diamondbacks+Ctyu5RiU3SWl
Christian Petersen/Getty Images North America
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MLB.com put together this very cool video montage reviewing the 2015 season and setting us up for what should be a wild 2016. Young stars, veterans chasing milestones, unpredictable divisional races.

It’s so close to spring training. Let’s do this.