San Francisco Giants v Los Angeles Dodgers

And That Happened: Opening Day’s scores and highlights

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For those of you new to in-season HardballTalk, know this: each weekday morning — and maybe some weekend mornings; I’m thinkin’ about it — I recap the previous day and/or night’s action in a little feature called “And That Happened.”  This is ATH’s fourth year, as I began it over at my old haunt, ShysterBall, where people seemed to like it well enough. If you care, it was named in honor of this video.

I’m told that was recording artist John Mayer, giving some impromptu play-by-play of  the A’s-Red Sox game which opened the 2008 season in Japan, but I’m not a big John Mayer fan so I don’t mind ripping off his bit.

The point, though, is like Mr. Mayer’s commentary, ATH is not meant to provide comprehensive or even necessarily lucid breakdowns of the previous night’s action. Oh, that happens sometimes, but mostly I’m just riffing here. Providing a little flavor of what went down in the game. Maybe an observation or an opinion or something kinda neat from the box score. Maybe an obscure movie line or two which, as long as Aubrey or David Huff remain in the majors, will likely include a few too many Groucho Marx bits.  If you want actual information, click the linked box score before every entry.  Any information I provide is, I assure you, completely by accident.

With that out of the way, let us begin our long journey through the major league season:

Dodgers 2, Giants 1: Buster Posey may be the great test case for whether people only accuse minority ballplayers of lackadaisical, addle-minded play. The run which broke the 0-0 tie was the result of Posey’s poor decision and poor throw trying to pick Matt Kemp off third. Yet, when it happened, the ESPN crew actually blamed the bad play on Pablo Sandoval, saying that he asked for the throw and didn’t do a great job trying to catch it. Maybe he did ask for it, but Posey is the catcher and he’s in charge out there. He should have thought better of it. And sorry, there was no way Sandoval could have gotten to that throw.  Then, in the ninth, Posey hit a little roller to first base that James Loney at first misplayed but then recovered and shoveled to Jonathan Broxton for the out. The ESPN crew lauded Loney for the play — which they should have, because it was a good recovery — but they made no mention of the fact that Posey was shuffling down the line with all the urgency of a condemned prisoner walking the green mile.

The booth walked back their comments regarding the pickoff throw after the commercial break, but both there and in the ninth the impulse to absolve Posey of his baseball sins seemed irresistible. All I could think was how different the reaction may have been had it been B.J. Upton or Hanley Ramirez making those decisions and not running out that roller.

Reds 7, Brewers 6: I would like it to be known that, in my little preview of yesterday’s action, I called Edinson Volquez out as being shaky.  To whom do I report to receive my laurels?  Fine, but that’s a laurel you owe me. Anyway, the Ramon Hernandez walkoff homer saved Volquez’s bacon. Too bad that so many Reds fans had already left the park and thus didn’t see it.  Cincy was a baseball town once. People here in Ohio swear to me that this is true.

Padres 5, Cardinals 3: Pujols goes 0 for 5 and grounds into three double plays. It’s tempting to say something more about that, but given that this brings the score to 1,404,492 times that Pujols did something good to, like, 8 times he did something bad over the past 11 years, I think he’s entitled to a pass here. If Ryan Franklin doesn’t give up a homer with two out in the ninth it doesn’t matter. If Ryan Theriot doesn’t make that error in the 11th, it probably doesn’t matter.  And while we’re on the subject, I expected letting Brendan Ryan go would cost the Cards on defense at some point, but who’d a thunk it would happen on Day One?

Angels 4, Royals 2: Jeff Francoeur had a homer and Melky Cabrera reached base four times.  When those guys are providing your offensive heroics you know you’re in trouble. Oh, and Francoeur came to bat with the bases loaded in the bottom of the eighth. He struck out swinging on a pitch that was above his neck, so it’s good to see him in midseason form.

Braves 2, Nationals 0: All Jason Heyward does is hit home runs in his first Opening Day day at-bat. Year-after-year! And Mac Thomason had a sharp observation over at Braves Journal:

Last year, Bobby often let Lowe work an inning too long, or a batter too long. Fredi didn’t do that this time. When Lowe’s 105th pitch walked Zimmerman with two out in the sixth, Fredi got the hook and brought in O’Flaherty, who allowed a flare single to LaRoche then got out of it.

And how. It’s almost certain that Bobby Cox leaves Lowe in there. Nice to see Fredi bring out the hook.  All of the reasons Fredi Gonzalez is like Bobby Cox are why he got the job. Because following a legend is so tough, however, and because the new guy doesn’t get the same kind of free pass the legend got for the same behavior, it will be the ways in which he differs from Cox and does things better than Cox did which will help him keep the job.

Yankees 6, Tigers 3: Curtis Granderson, like Dante in “Clerks,” wasn’t even supposed to be there yesterday thanks to a wonky oblique muscle.  But he made it, and he had a much better day than Dante did too, what with the go-ahead homer and the nice defense in center. At least I’m assuming he had a better day than Dante. I have no idea how Granderson’s conversations with his girlfriend went after the game. Beyond that, the Yankees script was followed nicely: a strong start from Sabathia and then some shut-down bullpen work from Chamberlain, Soriano and Rivera.  We’ll see that at least 37 times this year. 37!

Cardinals, Dexter Fowler agree to a five-year, $82 million deal

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 02:  Dexter Fowler #24 of the Chicago Cubs reacts during the seventh inning against the Cleveland Indians in Game Seven of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on November 2, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
Getty Images
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The Cardinals have officially signed outfielder Dexter Fowler to a five-year, $82.5 million contract. Fowler will also get a full no-trade clause.

The Cardinals gave Fowler a bigger deal than many speculated he’d get, as some reports predicted he’d get something in the $52-72 million range. His skills, however — he’s a fantastic leadoff hitter who plays a premium defensive position — definitely earned him some major dough. Fowler hit .276/.393/.447 with 13 homers, 48 RBI and 13 steals over 125 games in 2016 for the World Series champion Cubs.

For the Cardinals, this will allow Matt Carpenter to move down to the middle of the batting order and will shift Randal Grichuk to left field. It also takes a prime piece from the Cardinals’ biggest rival. For their part, earlier this offseason the Cubs signed former Cardinal center fielder Jon Jay. So that’s fun.

Are the Cardinals about to go on a free agent binge?

John Mozeliak AP
Associated Press
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The Cardinals have always emphasized building from within. In the 2016-17 offseason, however, they may end up being one of the bigger free agent buyers. At least according to some informed speculation.

St. Louis is already in agreement with Dexter Fowler. But Derrick Goold and Ben Frederickson of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch write today that the Cardinals “could become more aggressive than previously believed,” with Mark Trumbo and Edwin Encarnacion as “possible pursuits.” Worth noting that separate reports alleged some interest on the part of the Cards front office in free agent third baseman Justin Turner.

The Cardinals are already losing their first round pick due to the Fowler signing, so any other top free agent won’t cost them more than the money he’s owed. And as far as money goes, the Cardinals have a great deal of it, despite being a small market team. They have a billion dollar TV deal coming online and Matt Holliday and Jaime Garcia are off the payroll now. Spending big on a free agent or three would not cripple them or anything.

Encarnacion or Trumbo would be first baseman, which wold fly in the face of the Cards’ move of Matt Carpenter to first base (and, at least as far as Encarnacion goes, would fly in the face of good defense). Getting either of them would push Carpenter back to second, displacing Kolten Wong, or over to third, displacing Jhonny Peralta. If you’re going to do that, I’d say that Turner would make more sense, but what do I know?

Either way, the Cardinals may be entering a pretty interesting phase of their offseason now. And an unfamiliar one as, quite possibly, the top free agent buyer on the market.