The Yankees technology-unfriendly policies remain in place for 2011

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I get why the Yankees want to charge so much to park at a game — encouraging the use of mass transit is a good thing — but I don’t get why they don’t wish to encourage mass communications as well. Specifically, why they have continued their policy of not allowing iPads, e-readers and the like into the ballpark.  Jason at IIATMS has a detailed explanation and takedown of the policy here, noting the utter incoherence of the Yankees position on such devices.

I don’t know that such appeals will help because the Yankees tend to be more resistant to the complaints of cranky fans than other trams.  But I do wonder if commerce may change their tune. As in, Major League Baseball continuing its expansion into technology and social media, finding business partners in and creating business opportunities with the purveyors of handheld devices.  At some point — if we aren’t there already — the easiest way for fans to vote for All-Stars, buy concessions, enter contests and do all manner of other things in the ballpark will be to do so via handhelds, and absent a change, that will leave Yankees fans out in the cold.

Maybe phones will always be the number one choice for that sort of thing — and Yankee Stadium’s policies do not ban smart phones even though they would seem to present the same “risks” the Yankees think iPads do — but handheld use will only increase and, as it does, the Yankees’ policy will be increasingly annoying and out of touch.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.