The Cubs tell Carlos Silva not to let the door hit him in the … well, I’ll let them say it.


You may have heard that the Cubs released Carlos Silva. You may have also heard that — before he was released but after he was told that he wasn’t making the rotation — Silva ripped the Cubs in general and Cubs’ pitching coach Mark Riggins in particular over the way it was all handled.

Whatever, Silva. I mean, we can debate whether or not the Cubs handled this the right way — David Brown makes a good point or two about the Cubs’ decorum in delivering the news to Silva — but I think GM Jim Hendry pretty much nailed it in his comments after the release:

“Basically, he wasn’t good enough to make the team. We try to factor in not only spring training, but the second half of last year. You’re looking at a guy who had a 14-something ERA from July 11 on, and came to camp with the notion that he already had a spot in the rotation … Obviously, we’re dealing with a man who at this particular point of his career is not willing to face the facts that what he’s done the last few years, except for a two-month period (last year), is well below major league standards …”

Rarely do you hear a GM say it as frankly as that, but given Silva spouting off, Hendry likely felt that there was no reason to play the “he’s a competitor, but we decided to go in a different direction” game. Silva was scoffing at the notion of having to compete for a spot since the time camp began. And his efforts matched his attitude. Good riddance to bad rubbish.

And for what it’s worth, manager Mike Quade is not going to let Silva have the last word about all of this. And he breaks out the F-bombs in doing so:

Vodpod videos no longer available.


See ya later, Carlos. Likely not playing baseball, however.

Mike Trout has yet to strike out this spring

Rob Tringali/Getty Images

Everyone is well aware of how good Angels outfielder Mike Trout is at the game of baseball. The 26-year-old is already an all-time great, having won two MVP awards — and arguably deserving of two others — and the 2012 Rookie of the Year Award. He has accrued 54.2 WAR, per Baseball Reference, which is right around the threshold for a Hall of Fame career. Trout does it all: he draws walks, he hits for average, he hits for power, he steals bases, he plays good defense.

But here’s an achievement that is amazing even for a player like Trout: he has yet to strike out this spring. In 41 Cactus League plate appearances, he has 10 hits (including a triple and two homers) and six walks with zero strikeouts. Across his career, Trout has a 21.5 percent strikeout rate, right around the league average. He isn’t usually such a stickler for avoiding the punch-out, but this spring he is.

To put this in perspective, 134 players this spring have struck out at least 10 times, according to 938 players have struck out at least once. The only other players to have taken at least 10 at-bats without striking out this spring are Humberto Arteaga (Royals, 23 AB), Tony Cruz (Reds, 18 AB), Oscar Hernandez (Red Sox, 10 AB), and Jacob Stallings (Pirates, 18 AB).

According to Angels assistant hitting coach Paul Sorrento, the lack of strikeouts hasn’t been a conscious effort from Trout, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. Ho hum. The best player in baseball is apparently getting even better.