Murray Chass slams Stan Musial. Really.

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Some blogger who writes from home — claims he used to actually be a reporter with a big paper or something — decided today that the most pressing thing he had to do today was to cut Stan Musial down to size:

It turns out that the 90-year-old Musial is not the Saint Stan he is considered in St. Louis. For sure, Musial remains the great player he was in his Hall of Fame career and deserves all of the accolades he has received for his achievements in that career.

As a person, however, he left much to be desired. Marvin Miller raised the issue in a recent conversation and provided the evidence to make his case. It is a convincing one.

Actually, it’s not.  It’s two third-hand anecdotes in which someone told someone who told Miller about something Musial allegedly did. Or, rather, things employees at a restaurant for which he was almost certainly a hands-off owner did in denying Curt Flood a seat because he was black. And something a committee on which Musial served related to the first MLB pension system did. There’s really nothing in here about anything Musial himself did, and even the implications are contradicted by others.

This is weak sauce, even for Chass.  The same Chass who just recently got into a little trouble for another post he wrote, also based on a conversation with Miller, which Miller repudiated soon after. Wait, make that two of them.  It was hard to tell what happened in those cases, but I know one thing: if Chass is writing something based on his conversations with Marvin Miller, I’m not going to give him any benefit of the doubt.  Not that I give him much of that anyway.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.